Texas Agriculture March 3, 2017 : Page 13

Farmers, ranchers concerned about trade retaliation with Mexico By Landee Kieschnick TFB Communications Intern If President Donald Trump im-poses a tariff on Mexican goods, which he has mentioned as a possi-bility, the U.S. could see significant economic impacts. In response to Trump’s talks of a 20 percent tariff to pay for the bor-der wall, Mexican Senator Armando Rios Piter said he plans to introduce a bill to stop buying corn from the U.S. and shift those purchases to Brazil and Argentina. Mexico is currently the third larg-est trading partner for the U.S. with annual trade worth about $18.5 bil-lion. Piter reported that Mexico plans to travel to South American coun-tries within the next 20 days to look at quotas and changes to tariffs to facilitate more imports from those countries. The goal is to decrease Mexico’s reliance on the U.S. for its agricul-tural products due to the talk of tar-iffs on goods they sell to the U.S. And Piter’s intentions are making Texas and American farmers ner-vous. “Texas is uniquely situated right along the border. So any talk of hav-ing a trade war or retaliation is very concerning because it could have a very large effect on Texas farmers and ranchers,” Regan Beck, Texas Farm Bureau director of Govern-ment Affairs, said. Corn is an essential commodity in the American farm economy and one of the leading exports from the U.S. to Mexico. In 2015, American farmers sent $2.4 billion of corn to Mexico. In 1994, the first year for the North American Free Trade Agree-ment (NAFTA), corn exports to Mex-ico were only $391 million. “Since then until now, our trade with the rest of the world has tri-pled. However, for Canada and Mexico, which we’ve operated with under NAFTA, trade has quadru-pled,” Beck said. “So you can see that there’s a significant gain in our trade relationship between the countries by having NAFTA in place.” Corn, beef, poultry, grain sorghum and forestry products are major U.S. crops sent to Mexico, Beck noted. Each commodity could be affected by any trade retaliation between the countries. A loss of the Mexican market would push down prices for U.S. corn. For U.S. farmers dealing with a fourth consecutive year of declining net farm income, trade negotiations are needed to boost revenue. “Trade is important for all our Texas commodity prices, farm mar-kets and farmers and ranchers to be profitable,” Beck said. “Texas Farm Bureau will be working diligently to make sure those markets stay open.” From Wisconsin … America's Favorite Cheese Maker Distributed by: Sponsored by: Item # Wisconsin Cheese Variety Qty Farmers can give back to communities By Landee Kieschnick TFB Communications Intern Farmers are the cornerstone of the community, the backbone of the rural economy and the hands that hold the environment together. Many are actively involved in the community. And Texas farmers can also invest in youth by supporting their local public school districts through $10,000 and $25,000 grants for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education pro-grams through the Monsanto Fund’s America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program. “School districts can always use extra money, so the oppor-tunity to provide those funds to help students achieve or learn more is always going to be im-portant for strong communities and important for agriculture,” Heather Wolfe, customer advo-cacy manager for Monsanto, said. Farmers are encouraged to nominate a school. After a school district receives a nomination, the Monsanto Fund will notify the school district, which must then submit a grant application describing their proj-ect that enhances math and/or sci-ence education in the district. “A common ground that we’re seeing in each grant recipient is the need for hands-on and real world learning experiences to en-gage students in agricultural re-lated problems,” Wolfe said. “The emphasis on STEM programs is because moving forward, we feel that funding these initiatives is going to aid the next generation of problem solvers that will lead our ag communities.” The grant program has funded nearly $600,000 to schools in the Lone Star State alone since the program started in 2011. This year, the Monsanto Fund expects to award a total of $2.3 million through the program. 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Farmers Can Give Back to Communities

Landee Kieschnick

Farmers are the cornerstone of the community, the backbone of the rural economy and the hands that hold the environment together.

Many are actively involved in the community. And Texas farmers can also invest in youth by supporting their local public school districts through $10,000 and $25,000 grants for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education programs through the Monsanto Fund’s America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program.

“School districts can always use extra money, so the opportunity to provide those funds to help students achieve or learn more is always going to be important for strong communities and important for agriculture,” Heather Wolfe, customer advocacy manager for Monsanto, said.

Farmers are encouraged to nominate a school.

After a school district receives a nomination, the Monsanto Fund will notify the school district, which must then submit a grant application describing their project that enhances math and/or science education in the district.

“A common ground that we’re seeing in each grant recipient is the need for hands-on and real world learning experiences to engage students in agricultural related problems,” Wolfe said. “The emphasis on STEM programs is because moving forward, we feel that funding these initiatives is going to aid the next generation of problem solvers that will lead our ag communities.”

The grant program has funded nearly $600,000 to schools in the Lone Star State alone since the program started in 2011.

This year, the Monsanto Fund expects to award a total of $2.3 million through the program.

Nominations can be made online at GrowRuralEducation.com through April 1.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Farmers+Can+Give+Back+to+Communities/2723129/388436/article.html.

Farmers, Ranchers Concerned About Trade Retaliation with Mexico

Landee Kieschnick

If President Donald Trump imposes a tariff on Mexican goods, which he has mentioned as a possibility, the U.S. could see significant economic impacts.

In response to Trump’s talks of a 20 percent tariff to pay for the border wall, Mexican Senator Armando Rios Piter said he plans to introduce a bill to stop buying corn from the U.S. and shift those purchases to Brazil and Argentina.

Mexico is currently the third largest trading partner for the U.S. with annual trade worth about $18.5 billion.

Piter reported that Mexico plans to travel to South American countries within the next 20 days to look at quotas and changes to tariffs to facilitate more imports from those countries.

The goal is to decrease Mexico’s reliance on the U.S. for its agricultural products due to the talk of tariffs on goods they sell to the U.S. And Piter’s intentions are making Texas and American farmers nervous.

“Texas is uniquely situated right along the border. So any talk of having a trade war or retaliation is very concerning because it could have a very large effect on Texas farmers and ranchers,” Regan Beck, Texas Farm Bureau director of Government Affairs, said.

Corn is an essential commodity in the American farm economy and one of the leading exports from the U.S. to Mexico.

In 2015, American farmers sent $2.4 billion of corn to Mexico. In 1994, the first year for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), corn exports to Mexico were only $391 million.

“Since then until now, our trade with the rest of the world has tripled. However, for Canada and Mexico, which we’ve operated with under NAFTA, trade has quadrupled,” Beck said. “So you can see that there’s a significant gain in our trade relationship between the countries by having NAFTA in place.”

Corn, beef, poultry, grain sorghum and forestry products are major U.S. crops sent to Mexico, Beck noted. Each commodity could be affected by any trade retaliation between the countries.

A loss of the Mexican market would push down prices for U.S. corn.

For U.S. farmers dealing with a fourth consecutive year of declining net farm income, trade negotiations are needed to boost revenue.

“Trade is important for all our Texas commodity prices, farm markets and farmers and ranchers to be profitable,” Beck said. “Texas Farm Bureau will be working diligently to make sure those markets stay open.”

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Farmers%2C+Ranchers+Concerned+About+Trade+Retaliation+with+Mexico/2723130/388436/article.html.

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