Texas Agriculture February 17, 2017 : Page 17

(PLQHQWGRPDLQOHJLVODWLRQÀOHG SB 740, 741 and 742 to help landowners The Texans for Property Rights Co-alition applauds the filing of SB 740, 741 and 742 aimed at eminent domain reform. The bills expand upon prog-ress made in landmark 2011 eminent domain legislation. The three bills, au-thored by Senator Lois Kolkhorst, will help level the playing field for property owners who confront corporations and government entities with deep pockets and experienced legal teams. “Every Texan knows that our pri-vate property rights must be pro-tected,” said Senator Kolkhorst. “To protect landowners across Texas, I am proud to be working with the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers As-sociation, Texas Farm Bureau, Texas Wildlife Association and many others on a new property rights protection package, Senate Bills 740, 741 and 742. This legislative package gives all landowners the new tools and safe-guards they need to protect their land from eminent domain abuse.” “We are grateful to have an ally like Sen. Kolkhorst who is commit-ted to defending the rights of private landowners,” Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association President Richard Thorpe said. “Property owners continue to be at a huge disadvantage when navigating the condemnation process and these proposed reforms are a great step toward preserving our heritage of land ownership in Texas.” A growing state with a strong ap-petite for new development has put a target on Texas private property, leav-ing landowners searching for a fair offer and process in eminent domain cases. “We are proposing reasonable changes that many states already have in law. Texas should be a leader in strong and fair private property rights that allow for continued growth and economic prosperity,” Texas Farm Bureau President Russell Boening said. “We aim to build fairness and in-tegrity into the condemnation process to ensure landowners receive fair and just compensation.” The new legislation will provide for the reimbursement of landowner ex-penses if they are sued by a condem-nor and are ultimately awarded signif-icantly more than the final offer. It will also spell out the use and restriction details required within a condemnor’s “bona fide offer” to ensure the entity will properly use and maintain the property. The three bills provide common sense reforms in several areas of con-cern for landowners. Additional details on the coalition’s initiatives can be found on TexansForPropertyRights. com. About 95 percent of state land is privately owned, putting the needs of the public in direct conflict with Texas property owners’ rights. Fair compen-sation, the groups noted, should be the only option because private property owners find it difficult to face the fi-nancial burden of litigation. Led by Texas Farm Bureau, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers As-sociation and the Texas Wildlife Asso-ciation, the Texans for Property Rights Coalition consists of 23 organizations committed to the preservation of Tex-as’ private property rights. The coali-tion was organized to pursue eminent domain reform during the 2017 Texas legislative session, and will continue to work with legislators to secure the passage of these bills and others pro-posed in the senate that address the need for reform. a premise, an “infested quarantine” is issued for both the livestock and the premise. “In accordance with fever tick regulations, cattle and horses on the infested premises are system-atically inspected and treated at either 14-day or 28-day intervals, depending on the treatment pro-tocol developed for that herd and premises, for six to nine months, de-pendent upon the time of year the infestation is discovered,” TR Lans-ford, assistant executive director of Animal Health Programs for TAHC, said. “Cattle can be moved from the premises after two ‘clean’ inspections and dip treatments, between seven and 14 days apart, with the second treatment being through a swim vat.” For more information and updates on fever ticks, visit www.tahc.texas. gov. The Tick App, a free smartphone application, is also available at http:// tickapp.tamu.edu. Cattle fever ticks a growing concern By Julie Tomascik Editor The cattle fever tick, and the dis-ease it carries, has the capability to cripple the Texas cattle industry if it’s not contained. With the spread of ticks outside the permanent quarantine zone, Texas ranchers, veterinarians and animal health officials are growing increas-ingly concerned. As of Feb. 8, more than 500,000 acres in Texas are under various quarantines. Counties with infested premise quarantines include Cam-eron, Kleberg, Live Oak, Maverick, Starr, Webb, Willacy and Zapata. There are 2,083 adjacent and check quarantined premises and 98 exposed quarantined premises, ac-cording to the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC). Counties with exposed, adjacent or check premises quarantines include: Bastrop, Bee, Caldwell, Calhoun, Cameron, Colorado, Denton, DeWitt, Dimmit, Falls, Fayette, Frio, Goliad, Gonzales, Hidalgo, Jim Wells, Karnes, Kendall, Kinney, Kleberg, Live Oak, Maverick, McMullen, Milam, Mills, Parker, Runnels, Starr, Uvalde, Val Verde, Webb, Wharton, Willacy and Zapata. “I think we are less vigilant to check for ticks because the eradica-tion program worked so well,” said Jared Ranly, a large animal practitio-ner in Falls County. Eradication programs began in the early 1900s, and a permanent buffer zone was created in 1943 along the Texas-Mexico border to help prevent re-establishment of ticks. The disease could have a cata-strophic effect on Texas, the number one cattle state in the nation, because of the pest’s reproductive cycle. Females lay up to 4,000 eggs, each of which finds a host to start the life cycle again. The tick remains on the host for about 25 days. Any animal movement during this time allows the ticks to be dropped in new loca-tions, further spreading the disease. The tick carries a disease agent called Babesia. The organism at-tacks red blood cells and causes anemia and death following symp-toms, such as spleen and liver en-largement and high fever. If the cattle fever tick feeds on blood from an infected animal and lays eggs, the offspring will carry the disease agent to the animal it feeds on. Once fever ticks are confirmed on F EBRUARY 17 , 2017 17

Cattle Fever Ticks a Growing Concern

Julie Tomascik

The cattle fever tick, and the disease it carries, has the capability to cripple the Texas cattle industry if it’s not contained.

With the spread of ticks outside the permanent quarantine zone, Texas ranchers, veterinarians and animal health officials are growing increasingly concerned.

As of Feb. 8, more than 500,000 acres in Texas are under various quarantines. Counties with infested premise quarantines include Cameron, Kleberg, Live Oak, Maverick, Starr, Webb, Willacy and Zapata.

There are 2,083 adjacent and check quarantined premises and 98 exposed quarantined premises, according to the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC).

Counties with exposed, adjacent or check premises quarantines include: Bastrop, Bee, Caldwell, Calhoun, Cameron, Colorado, Denton, DeWitt, Dimmit, Falls, Fayette, Frio, Goliad, Gonzales, Hidalgo, Jim Wells, Karnes, Kendall, Kinney, Kleberg, Live Oak, Maverick, McMullen, Milam, Mills, Parker, Runnels, Starr, Uvalde, Val Verde, Webb, Wharton, Willacy and Zapata.

“I think we are less vigilant to check for ticks because the eradication program worked so well,” said Jared Ranly, a large animal practitioner in Falls County.

Eradication programs began in the early 1900s, and a permanent buffer zone was created in 1943 along the Texas-Mexico border to help prevent re-establishment of ticks.

The disease could have a catastrophic effect on Texas, the number one cattle state in the nation, because of the pest’s reproductive cycle.

Females lay up to 4,000 eggs, each of which finds a host to start the life cycle again. The tick remains on the host for about 25 days. Any animal movement during this time allows the ticks to be dropped in new locations, further spreading the disease.

The tick carries a disease agent called Babesia. The organism attacks red blood cells and causes anemia and death following symptoms, such as spleen and liver enlargement and high fever.

If the cattle fever tick feeds on blood from an infected animal and lays eggs, the offspring will carry the disease agent to the animal it feeds on.

Once fever ticks are confirmed on a premise, an “infested quarantine” is issued for both the livestock and the premise.

“In accordance with fever tick regulations, cattle and horses on the infested premises are systematically inspected and treated at either 14-day or 28-day intervals, depending on the treatment protocol developed for that herd and premises, for six to nine months, dependent upon the time of year the infestation is discovered,” TR Lansford, assistant executive director of Animal Health Programs for TAHC, said. “Cattle can be moved from the premises after two ‘clean’ inspections and dip treatments, between seven and 14 days apart, with the second treatment being through a swim vat.”

For more information and updates on fever ticks, visit www.tahc.texas.gov. The Tick App, a free smartphone application, is also available at http://tickapp.tamu.edu.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Cattle+Fever+Ticks+a+Growing+Concern/2712219/384301/article.html.

Eminent Domain Legislation Filed

SB 740, 741 and 742 to help landowners

The Texans for Property Rights Coalition applauds the filing of SB 740, 741 and 742 aimed at eminent domain reform. The bills expand upon progress made in landmark 2011 eminent domain legislation. The three bills, authored by Senator Lois Kolkhorst, will help level the playing field for property owners who confront corporations and government entities with deep pockets and experienced legal teams.

“Every Texan knows that our private property rights must be protected,” said Senator Kolkhorst. “To protect landowners across Texas, I am proud to be working with the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, Texas Farm Bureau, Texas Wildlife Association and many others on a new property rights protection package, Senate Bills 740, 741 and 742. This legislative package gives all landowners the new tools and safeguards they need to protect their land from eminent domain abuse.”

“We are grateful to have an ally like Sen. Kolkhorst who is committed to defending the rights of private landowners,” Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association President Richard Thorpe said. “Property owners continue to be at a huge disadvantage when navigating the condemnation process and these proposed reforms are a great step toward preserving our heritage of land ownership in Texas.”

A growing state with a strong appetite for new development has put a target on Texas private property, leaving landowners searching for a fair offer and process in eminent domain cases.

“We are proposing reasonable changes that many states already have in law. Texas should be a leader in strong and fair private property rights that allow for continued growth and economic prosperity,” Texas Farm Bureau President Russell Boening said. “We aim to build fairness and integrity into the condemnation process to ensure landowners receive fair and just compensation.”

The new legislation will provide for the reimbursement of landowner expenses if they are sued by a condemnor and are ultimately awarded significantly more than the final offer. It will also spell out the use and restriction details required within a condemnor’s “bona fide offer” to ensure the entity will properly use and maintain the property.

The three bills provide common sense reforms in several areas of concern for landowners. Additional details on the coalition’s initiatives can be found on TexansForPropertyRights.com.

About 95 percent of state land is privately owned, putting the needs of the public in direct conflict with Texas property owners’ rights. Fair compensation, the groups noted, should be the only option because private property owners find it difficult to face the financial burden of litigation.

Led by Texas Farm Bureau, Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association and the Texas Wildlife Association, the Texans for Property Rights Coalition consists of 23 organizations committed to the preservation of Texas’ private property rights. The coalition was organized to pursue eminent domain reform during the 2017 Texas legislative session, and will continue to work with legislators to secure the passage of these bills and others proposed in the senate that address the need for reform.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Eminent+Domain+Legislation+Filed+/2712220/384301/article.html.

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