Texas Agriculture February 3, 2017 : Page 11

86WROHDYH7UDQV
3DFLÀF3DUWQHUVKLS By Jessica Domel Multimedia Editor Fulfilling a campaign promise, President Donald Trump signed an executive order Jan. 23 withdrawing the United States from the Trans-Pa-cific Partnership (TPP). The move, according to the Ameri-can Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF), could hurt American farmers, ranch-ers and businesses. “U.S. agriculture creates jobs and supports economic growth in rural America, and American agriculture depends on maintaining and increas-ing access to markets outside the United States,” AFBF President Zip-py Duvall said. “Trade is vital to the success of our nation’s farmers and ranchers. More than 25 percent of all U.S. ag production ultimately goes to markets outside our borders.” AFBF viewed TPP as a positive agreement for agriculture—one that could have added $4.4 billion annually to a struggling agricultural economy. “With this decision, it is critical that the new administration begin work immediately to do all it can to develop new markets for U.S. agricul-tural goods and to protect and advance U.S. agricultural interests in the criti-cal Asia-Pacific region,” Duvall said. The TPP was a 12-national multi-lateral agreement between the U.S., Canada and 10 other Asia-Pacific countries. Had it been approved by Congress, the partnership would have been the largest free trade deal to ever involve the United States. TPP negotiations, coordinated un-der the Obama administration, ended in October 2015 after days of meet-ings. The final agreement updated previous agreements and called for the elimination or reduction of more than 18,000 taxes other countries placed on U.S. goods in the form of tariffs. “American agriculture is virtually always a winner when trade agree-ments remove barriers to U.S. crop and livestock exports because we im-pose very few compared to other na-tions,” Duvall said. “We have much to gain through strong trade agree-ments. AFBF pledges to work with the administration to help ensure that American agriculture can compete on a level playing field in markets around the world. But we need the adminis-tration’s commitment to ensuring we do not lose the ground gained—wheth-er in the Asia-Pacific, North America, Europe or other parts of the world.” On the campaign trail in 2016, Trump promised to lead the U.S. out of the deal, citing concerns with the po-tential loss of American jobs. “My agenda will be based on a simple core principle, putting America first,” Trump said in a YouTube video explaining his goals following the elec-tion. “Whether it’s producing steel, building cars or curing disease, I want the next generation of production and innovation to happen right here on our great homeland.” As part of his plan, Trump’s transi-tion team created a list of things they could do on day one to bring back jobs. That list included an exit from TPP. Trump called TPP “a potential di-saster for our country.” “Instead, we will negotiate fair, bi-lateral trade deals that bring jobs and industry back onto American shores,” Trump said. The administration is also expected to re-examine the terms of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In his statement on Jan. 23, Duvall re-emphasized the impact NAFTA has on American agriculture. “U.S. agricultural exports to Cana-da and Mexico have quadrupled from $8.9 billion in 1993 to over $38 billion today, due in large part to NAFTA,” Du-vall said. “Any renegotiation of NAFTA must recognize the gains achieved by American agriculture and assure that U.S. ag trade with Canada and Mexico remains strong. AFBF will work with the administration to remove remain-ing barriers that hamstring the abil-ity of America’s farmers and ranchers to benefit from trading relationships with our important North American trading partners.” Following the president’s recent ac-tion, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said he believes Trump under-stands the value of free trade and he will keep pitching a multinational trade pact. Reuters reports Abe wants to stregthen the U.S.-Japan security al-liance and would like to explain how Japanese companies have contributed to the U.S. economy. The U.S. already has trade agree-ments with TPP countries Australia, Canada, Chile, Mexico, Singapore and Peru. Jan. 23 was the first full weekday in office for President Trump. In addition to signing the order to leave TPP, he also ordered a hiring freeze for all non-military federal jobs. He then reinstituted limits on non-governmental organizations that op-erate overseas and receive American taxpayer money from performing abortions, according to the New York Times. From Wisconsin … America's Favorite Cheese Maker Distributed by: Sponsored by: Item # Wisconsin Cheese Variety Qty 91-0 91-1 91-2 91-3 91-5 91-6 91-7 91-8 91-9 91-10 60 80 2113 9773 4/1 lb CoJack Flats 4/1 lb Sharp Cheddar Flats 4/1 lb Medium Cheddar Flats 4/1 lb Colby Flats 4/1 lb Variety Pack Flats -1 lb of ea: CoJack, Sharp Cheddar, Medium Cheddar, & Colby Wisconsin Farm Bureau ® Cost Total $33.25 ea $34.25 ea $34.00 ea $33.00 ea $35.00 ea $32.50 $31.00 $31.00 $30.75 ea ea ea ea 4/10 oz Baby Swiss Flats 4/10 oz Muenster Flats 4/10 oz Pepper Jack Flats 4/10 oz Mozzarella Flats 4/10 oz Variety Pack Flats -10 oz of ea: Baby Swiss, Muenster, Pepper Jack & Mozzarella $34.25 ea $36.75 ea $40.00 ea $30.50 ea $36.00 ea TOTAL 5 lb Medium Cheddar Round 5 lb Baby Swiss Loaf 30 oz Variety Round -Combination of: Pepper Jack, CoJack, Mild Cheddar & Colby Variety Pack of Spreads: 1 -1 lb Tub of Each: Sharp Cheddar, Smokey Bacon, Horseradish, & Port Wine OFFER EXPIRES: APRIL 14, 2017 Name: Address: (SORRY, NO PO BOX DELIVERIES) City: Phone: Email: State: F EBRUARY 3 , 2017 Zip: PLEASE ALLOW 3 WEEKS FOR DELIVERY Make Checks To: Mail Completed Form To: JIM'S CHEESE LLC ATTN: TAMMY 410 PORTLAND RD WATERLOO, WI 53594 To request a complete list of items available or if you have any questions Please Call: 1-877-478-0444 Fax: 1-920-478-2320 or E-mail: tammy@jimscheese.com There is an additonal charge for shipping to Alaska -please call for rate. 11

U.S to Leave Trans-Pacific Partnership

Jessica Domel

Fulfilling a campaign promise, President Donald Trump signed an executive order Jan. 23 withdrawing the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

The move, according to the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF), could hurt American farmers, ranchers and businesses.

“U.S. agriculture creates jobs and supports economic growth in rural America, and American agriculture depends on maintaining and increasing access to markets outside the United States,” AFBF President Zippy Duvall said. “Trade is vital to the success of our nation’s farmers and ranchers. More than 25 percent of all U.S. ag production ultimately goes to markets outside our borders.”

AFBF viewed TPP as a positive agreement for agriculture—one that could have added $4.4 billion annually to a struggling agricultural economy.

“With this decision, it is critical that the new administration begin work immediately to do all it can to develop new markets for U.S. agricultural goods and to protect and advance U.S. agricultural interests in the critical Asia-Pacific region,” Duvall said.

The TPP was a 12-national multilateral agreement between the U.S., Canada and 10 other Asia-Pacific countries.

Had it been approved by Congress, the partnership would have been the largest free trade deal to ever involve the United States.

TPP negotiations, coordinated under the Obama administration, ended in October 2015 after days of meetings. The final agreement updated previous agreements and called for the elimination or reduction of more than 18,000 taxes other countries placed on U.S. goods in the form of tariffs.

“American agriculture is virtually always a winner when trade agreements remove barriers to U.S. crop and livestock exports because we impose very few compared to other nations,” Duvall said. “We have much to gain through strong trade agreements. AFBF pledges to work with the administration to help ensure that American agriculture can compete on a level playing field in markets around the world. But we need the administration’s commitment to ensuring we do not lose the ground gained—whether in the Asia-Pacific, North America, Europe or other parts of the world.”

On the campaign trail in 2016, Trump promised to lead the U.S. out of the deal, citing concerns with the potential loss of American jobs.

“My agenda will be based on a simple core principle, putting America first,” Trump said in a YouTube video explaining his goals following the election. “Whether it’s producing steel, building cars or curing disease, I want the next generation of production and innovation to happen right here on our great homeland.”

As part of his plan, Trump’s transition team created a list of things they could do on day one to bring back jobs. That list included an exit from TPP.

Trump called TPP “a potential disaster for our country.”

“Instead, we will negotiate fair, bilateral trade deals that bring jobs and industry back onto American shores,” Trump said.

The administration is also expected to re-examine the terms of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). In his statement on Jan. 23, Duvall re-emphasized the impact NAFTA has on American agriculture.

“U.S. agricultural exports to Canada and Mexico have quadrupled from $8.9 billion in 1993 to over $38 billion today, due in large part to NAFTA,” Duvall said. “Any renegotiation of NAFTA must recognize the gains achieved by American agriculture and assure that U.S. ag trade with Canada and Mexico remains strong. AFBF will work with the administration to remove remaining barriers that hamstring the ability of America’s farmers and ranchers to benefit from trading relationships with our important North American trading partners.”

Following the president’s recent action, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said he believes Trump understands the value of free trade and he will keep pitching a multinational trade pact.

Reuters reports Abe wants to strengthen the U.S.-Japan security alliance and would like to explain how Japanese companies have contributed to the U.S. economy.

The U.S. already has trade agreements with TPP countries Australia, Canada, Chile, Mexico, Singapore and Peru.

Jan. 23 was the first full weekday in office for President Trump. In addition to signing the order to leave TPP, he also ordered a hiring freeze for all nonmilitary federal jobs.

He then reinstituted limits on nongovernmental organizations that operate overseas and receive American taxpayer money from performing abortions, according to the New York Times.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/U.S+to+Leave+Trans-Pacific+Partnership/2703958/381757/article.html.

Jim's Cheese LLC

Using a screen reader? Click Here