Texas Agriculture December 2, 2016 : Page 22

The countdown is on to the Vet Feed Directive By Julie Tomascik Associate Editor A growing herd or a healthy flock—feeding livestock and poul-try will be guided by another regu-lation with the new year. The Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) will expand on Jan. 1, 2017. The once limited regulation will in-clude eight additional antimicrobi-al classes that farmers and ranch-ers have routinely used without direct veterinary oversight. The expansion comes on the heels of concern for antimicrobial resistance to medications being transferred from livestock popula-tions to human health. To curb the potential resistance, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued guidance documents to ease manufacturers, veterinar-ians and farmers into the era of ad-ditional oversight. Guidance 209 called on manufac-turers to change label indications for antibiotics. Medicines with label claims to improve feed efficiency or weight gain would no longer be ac-ceptable. The FDA wanted antibiot-ics to be used for disease treatment or prevention of disease. Guidance 213 requires that all antibiotics classified as medically important for human health must be prescribed by a veterinary feed directive in order for farmers and ranchers to mix that product into a feed ration. That’s the biggest hurdle start-ing next year. “Farmers and ranchers will have a big change when it comes to treat-ing livestock and poultry with an-tibiotics mixed with feed beginning in January 2017,” said Tracy To-mascik, Texas Farm Bureau associ-proactive, bringing home medicated feed will be delayed. “In order to get a veterinary feed directive—the prescription needed for purchase—farmers and ranch-ers must go through their veterinar-ian and that requires documenting a valid veterinary-client-patient-re-vent sickness in livestock and poul-try. “Veterinarians have always worked hard to help farmers and ranchers avoid instances when their animals get sick. That’s not good for anyone or the animals,” Tomascik said. He noted the regulation will in-volve more steps for all parties in-volved—ranchers, veterinarians, feed mills and feed stores. “Although there will be extra steps, if we all think proactively about disease, it won’t be much of an issue,” Tomascik said. There’s not a one-size-fits-all ap-proach that fits for farms and ranch-es. But a working relationship with veterinarians is important today, and will continue to grow in the com-ing years. “Today we are only talking about greater oversight with drugs that are important for human health when they’re mixed into feed ra-tions,” Tomascik said. “Those same medications are often used as inject-able formulas and that does not fall into the Vet Feed Directive category.” Tomascik urges farmers and ranchers to review their current use of feed-grade medications with their veterinarian to gain an un-derstanding of how the changes will affect the future of the opera-tion and talk with their feed store in advance of purchasing medicat-ed feed. Affected feed-use antimicrobials Antimicrobial Class Amniglycosides Diaminopyrimidines Lincosamides Macrolides Penicillins Streptogramins Sulfas Tetracycline Specific drugs approved for use in feed Apramycin, Hygromycin B, Neomycin, Streptomycin Ormetoprim Lincomycin Erythromycin, Oleandomycin, Tylosin Penicillin Virginiamycin Sulfadimethoxine, Sulfamerazine, Sulfamethazine, Sulfaquinoxaline Chlortetracycline, Oxytetracycline *Information from U.S. Food and Drug Administration ate director of Commodity and Reg-ulatory Activities. “For many years, we all could make a stop at the local feed store and purchase medicated feeds to use on our farms. Now, we’ll have to get a feeding directive to make that purchase.” If farmers and ranchers aren’t lationship (VCPR),” Tomascik said. The VCPR is proof that a veteri-narian understands the operation, the farm goals and how medicated feed might help treat or prevent sickness. The less obvious effect of an expanded VFD is even greater emphasis on management to pre-22 D ECEMBER 2 , 2016

The Countdown Is on to the Vet Feed Directive

Julie Tomascik

A growing herd or a healthy flock—feeding livestock and poultry will be guided by another regulation with the new year.

The Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) will expand on Jan. 1, 2017. The once limited regulation will include eight additional antimicrobial classes that farmers and ranchers have routinely used without direct veterinary oversight.

The expansion comes on the heels of concern for antimicrobial resistance to medications being transferred from livestock populations to human health.

To curb the potential resistance, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued guidance documents to ease manufacturers, veterinarians and farmers into the era of additional oversight.

Guidance 209 called on manufacturers to change label indications for antibiotics. Medicines with label claims to improve feed efficiency or weight gain would no longer be acceptable. The FDA wanted antibiotics to be used for disease treatment or prevention of disease.

Guidance 213 requires that all antibiotics classified as medically important for human health must be prescribed by a veterinary feed directive in order for farmers and ranchers to mix that product into a feed ration.

That’s the biggest hurdle starting next year.

“Farmers and ranchers will have a big change when it comes to treating livestock and poultry with antibiotics mixed with feed beginning in January 2017,” said Tracy Tomascik, Texas Farm Bureau associate director of Commodity and Regulatory Activities. “For many years, we all could make a stop at the local feed store and purchase medicated feeds to use on our farms. Now, we’ll have to get a feeding directive to make that purchase.”

If farmers and ranchers aren’t proactive, bringing home medicated feed will be delayed.

“In order to get a veterinary feed directive—the prescription needed for purchase—farmers and ranchers must go through their veterinarian and that requires documenting a valid veterinary-client-patient-relationship (VCPR),” Tomascik said.

The VCPR is proof that a veterinarian understands the operation, the farm goals and how medicated feed might help treat or prevent sickness. The less obvious effect of an expanded VFD is even greater emphasis on management to prevent sickness in livestock and poultry.

“Veterinarians have always worked hard to help farmers and ranchers avoid instances when their animals get sick. That’s not good for anyone or the animals,” Tomascik said.

He noted the regulation will involve more steps for all parties involved— ranchers, veterinarians, feed mills and feed stores.

“Although there will be extra steps, if we all think proactively about disease, it won’t be much of an issue,” Tomascik said.

There’s not a one-size-fits-all approach that fits for farms and ranches. But a working relationship with veterinarians is important today, and will continue to grow in the coming years.

“Today we are only talking about greater oversight with drugs that are important for human health when they’re mixed into feed rations,” Tomascik said. “Those same medications are often used as injectable formulas and that does not fall into the Vet Feed Directive category.”

Tomascik urges farmers and ranchers to review their current use of feed-grade medications with their veterinarian to gain an understanding of how the changes will affect the future of the operation and talk with their feed store in advance of purchasing medicated feed.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/The+Countdown+Is+on+to+the+Vet+Feed+Directive/2653527/363631/article.html.

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