Texas Agriculture November 4, 2016 : Page 20

Wanted: Low-carb nutrition for horses with special diet needs Equi-Analytical Laboratories offer a variety of forage test pack-ages from its Ithaca, New York, There are two conditions of facility. It is a Dairy One Enter-ponies and older horses that /&#04;0&#0b;&#1e;#&#0e;&#1d;&#07;&#08; &#04;5&#1b; &#14;&#04; /&#04;, &#07; &#04;0&#06;&#0e;&#0e;&#08;&#07; &#04;&#19;&#02;&#1b; &#19;&#04; prise dedicated to serving the have many equine owners des-equine community. perate for help. "#&#04;.&#06;!$&#1f;&#08;&#0c; ,&#07; &#04;0&#06;&#0e;&#0e;&#08;&#07; To evaluate carbohydrates, The syndromes are called pi-, &#1e;*&#08;#&#0e;&#1e;&&#1f;&#08;&#04;6 &#08;&#07;* &#04;@, 6A&#11;&#04;0&#10; &#06;&#1f;4&#1f;& &#1b; &#16;( &#1b; &#16;&#01; Equi-Analytical Laboratories of-tuitary pars intermedia dysfunc-/ *4&#1f;&&#1b; / *4&#1f;&&#1b; 8&#07;&#1d;&#0c;&#08;&#04;)&#07;&#0b;&#0e;&#08;&#1e; &#14;&#03; &#1b; ( &#15;5&#1b; &#02;&#14;&#03; &#1b; &#19; &#15;&#19;&#1b; &#02; fers starch, water soluble carbo-tion (PPID)—formerly equine 6#&#0e;&#1e;!&#06;&#0e;&#08;&#0c;&#04;1 #&#1e; &#08; &#1b; &#02;5 &#14;&#1b; 5&#1b; &#02;&#16; &#14;&#1b; &#01; hydrates and ethanol soluble car-Cushing’s disease—and equine "&#10; &#1e;&#0c;&#04;, &#08;&#0e;&#08;&#07;*&#08; &#0e;&#04;<&#1e;&&#08;&#07;&#04;@", <A &#02;&#15;&#1b; &#17; &#14;&#17;5&#1b; &#02; &#02;5&#1b; &#01; &#14;55&#1b; &#15; &#12;&#08;&#1d;&#0e;&#07;&#06;&#1f;&#04;, &#08;&#0e;&#08;&#07;*&#08; &#0e;&#04;<&#1e;&&#08;&#07;&#04;@&#06;&#12;, <A 5&#17;&#1b; &#19; (&#19;&#19;&#1b; &#03;&#01;&#03; &#1b; ( &#02;&#14;&#16;&#1b; &#15; bohydrates testing in a variety of metabolic syndrome (EMS). &#05;.8&#04;@&#05;&#06;&#0e;&#08;&#07;&#04;.&#0b;&#1f;&#1b; &#04;8&#06;&#07;&#&#1b; A&#15;&#1b; &#16; (&#14;&#1b; &#16;&#17;&#1b; &#14; (&#02;&#1b; ( packages. The conditions can lead to 6.8&#04;@.&#1e;!$&#1f;&#08;&#04;.&#1d;*&#06;&#07;#A &#15;&#1b; &#17;(&#03; &#1b; &#17;&#15;&#1b; &#16; (&#14;&#1b; &#16; “The horse community is defi-laminitis and then founder. .&#0e;&#06;&#07;&#10; &#0f; &#14;&#1b; &#14;&#15;&#1b; &#16;&#14;&#1b; &#14;&#17;&#1b; &#14; &#12;&#0b; &#04;<&#1e;&&#08;&#07;&#04;8&#06;&#07;&&#1b; &#04;@&#12;<8A &#19;&#1b; ( &#15;&#14;&#1b; &#17;&#19;&#1b; &#16; &#15;&#15;&#1b; ( nitely trending in the right direc-A huge struggle for owners / *4&#1f;&&#1b; / *4&#1f;&&#1b; tion by arming themselves with is finding the right hay to feed. 8&#06;&#1f;&#10; &#1e;&#1d;! &#1b; &#02;&#19; &#14;&#1b; &#01;&#19; &#1b; &#15;( &#14;&#1b; &#19;&#14; hay and feed analysis informa-Not until recently did ani-)&#0f; &#0b;#$&#0f; &#0b;&#07;&#1d;# &#1b; &#14;&#19; &#1b; &#16;&#17; &#1b; (&#03; &#1b; &#19;&#14; tion, because they now realize it mal health professionals iden-"#&#04;<&#08;&#0c; &#14;&#03; &#03; /&#04;, &#07; results in improved diet formula-tify a common cause of the &#0a;<3 &#16;&#03; tion decisions,” said the lab’s For-problems—high levels of insu-Test results of a coastal Bermuda sample from Central Texas indicate the hay is lin in the blood. suitable for a horse needing less than 10 percent non-structural carbohydrates–water age Laboratory Chemist Michael In PPID, horses have a soluble carbohydrates (WSC), plus starch. Equi-Analytical Laboratories reports J. Reuter. “Evidence that owners growth on the pituitary gland average carbohydrate levels for typical grass hay it tested from 2000-2016 are 11.5 are embracing change is reflected in the number of samples pro-at the base of the brain. The percent (WSC) and 1.8 percent (starch). cessed at our lab. What began in send their horse into another bout horse receive the right nutrition. growth produces hormones 2004 with 1,000 samples now has “You need to be careful about the of lameness. that increase levels of insulin in the “Many horse owners can only evolved to over 7,000 annually and nutrition the horse gets. It needs blood. In EMS, horses and ponies of any a ration with less than 10 percent store 15-20 bales a week. As a re-still growing.” Test offerings at Equi-Analytical age have Insulin Dysregulation, non-structural carbohydrates,” Judd sult, they are stuck with having to or hyperinsulinemia. Many gain said. “This includes the hay, the buy whatever is available in the Laboratories www.equi-analytical . weight easily, although thin horses grain and it includes the pasture. feed store that day, whether the com range from $7 to $79. The cost may also have high insulin levels. But, unfortunately, most of these hay is right for their horses or not,” of the “Fast Track” testing package These horses and ponies are called horses that are insulin-resistant Watts said. “I fully believe horse is $18. The non-structural carbohy-owners would pay a premium to be drate percentage in the sample test-cannot have pasture.” “easy keepers.” It’s easier said than done in find-able to go into a hay yard and se-ed (water soluble carbohydrates plus Dr. Bob Judd, a veterinarian in Hewitt who is board-certified ing the right hay for these circum-lect the hay that is right for their starch) is 5.9 percent as fed and 6.2 percent as dry matter. (See image.) horses.” in equine practice, has worked on stances. Watts believes a great opportuni-Watts contends hay growers Kathryn Watts is a professional horses since 1980. He also hosts Texas Vet News on the Texas Farm crop consultant living in Arizona. could use a “value-added concept” ty exists to match low-carb hay with Her website, www.safergrass.com , for pre-tested hay. Hay growers horse owners desperate to care for Bureau Radio Network. He said it’s estimated as many as is a leading national provider of for-aren’t taking advantage of hay test-animals with special diet needs. “I think we can fix the problem ing in order to reach the right own-20 percent of horses 15 years and age information and research. by making the hay more available, She said the vast majority of er, she said. older have PPID. Judd agreed growers need to test somehow, someway,” Watts said. “I Common symptoms of PPID are horse owners have no way to locate believe veterinarians could even a lack of shedding of the horse, in-and purchase low-carb hay. In fact, their hay more thoroughly. “I think it’s critical. If you’re go-be a part of closing the gap. They creased water consumption and very few hay growers actually test ing to produce hay, you need to could market tested, low-carb hay urination, increased susceptibility their bales for carbohydrates. It’s a worldwide problem, she know what’s going on with the hay,” for horse clients, the same way they to infection and, probably the most he said. “A lot of people produce market specialty diets in their office important, Judd said, laminitis and said. In the absence of a test, horse hay and test for crude protein, and for sick dogs. It’s adding value to the subsequent founder. There is critical once-a-day medi-owners must either soak the hay that’s great to do. But that doesn’t hay.” Judd suggested veterinarians can cation available for horses that test prior to feeding in an effort to lower tell us anything about the other serve as a resource for clients, refer-the carbohydrate levels, find an-nutritional aspects of the hay. And positive for PPID. Judd said if the horse is also hy-other hay or feed they can get, play-some of these test results are ex-ring them to hay growers who have perinsulinemic, either as a result ing Russian roulette, she said, hop-tremely important for horses that the kind of hay they need for their horses. of PPID or EMS, it’s important the ing the next batch of hay does not need a specific kind of hay.” By Gary Joiner Editor " &#06;&#1f; #&#1e;#&#04;$&#08;&#07;% &#0b;&#07;!&#08;&#0c;&#04;& ' 20 N OVEMBER 4 , 2016

Wanted: Low-Carb Nutrition for Horses with Special Diet Needs

Gary Joiner

There are two conditions of ponies and older horses that have many equine owners desperate for help.

The syndromes are called pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID)—formerly equine Cushing’s disease—and equine metabolic syndrome (EMS).

The conditions can lead to laminitis and then founder.

A huge struggle for owners is finding the right hay to feed.

Not until recently did animal health professionals identify a common cause of the problems—high levels of insulin in the blood.

In PPID, horses have a growth on the pituitary gland at the base of the brain. The growth produces hormones that increase levels of insulin in the blood.

In EMS, horses and ponies of any age have Insulin Dysregulation, or hyperinsulinemia. Many gain weight easily, although thin horses may also have high insulin levels. These horses and ponies are called “easy keepers.”

Dr. Bob Judd, a veterinarian in Hewitt who is board-certified in equine practice, has worked on horses since 1980. He also hosts Texas Vet News on the Texas Farm Bureau Radio Network.

He said it’s estimated as many as 20 percent of horses 15 years and older have PPID.

Common symptoms of PPID are a lack of shedding of the horse, increased water consumption and urination, increased susceptibility to infection and, probably the most important, Judd said, laminitis and subsequent founder.

There is critical once-a-day medication available for horses that test positive for PPID.

Judd said if the horse is also hyperinsulinemic, either as a result of PPID or EMS, it’s important the horse receive the right nutrition.

“You need to be careful about the nutrition the horse gets. It needs a ration with less than 10 percent non-structural carbohydrates,” Judd said. “This includes the hay, the grain and it includes the pasture. But, unfortunately, most of these horses that are insulin-resistant cannot have pasture.”

It’s easier said than done in finding the right hay for these circumstances.

Kathryn Watts is a professional crop consultant living in Arizona. Her website, www.safergrass.com, is a leading national provider of forage information and research.

She said the vast majority of horse owners have no way to locate and purchase low-carb hay. In fact, very few hay growers actually test their bales for carbohydrates.

It’s a worldwide problem, she said.

In the absence of a test, horse owners must either soak the hay prior to feeding in an effort to lower the carbohydrate levels, find another hay or feed they can get, playing Russian roulette, she said, hoping the next batch of hay does not send their horse into another bout of lameness.

“Many horse owners can only store 15-20 bales a week. As a result, they are stuck with having to buy whatever is available in the feed store that day, whether the hay is right for their horses or not,” Watts said. “I fully believe horse owners would pay a premium to be able to go into a hay yard and select the hay that is right for their horses.”

Watts contends hay growers could use a “value-added concept” for pre-tested hay. Hay growers aren’t taking advantage of hay testing in order to reach the right owner, she said.

Judd agreed growers need to test their hay more thoroughly.

“I think it’s critical. If you’re going to produce hay, you need to know what’s going on with the hay,” he said. “A lot of people produce hay and test for crude protein, and that’s great to do. But that doesn’t tell us anything about the other nutritional aspects of the hay. And some of these test results are extremely important for horses that need a specific kind of hay.”

Equi-Analytical Laboratories offer a variety of forage test packages from its Ithaca, New York, facility. It is a Dairy One Enterprise dedicated to serving the equine community.

To evaluate carbohydrates, Equi-Analytical Laboratories offers starch, water soluble carbohydrates and ethanol soluble carbohydrates testing in a variety of packages.

“The horse community is definitely trending in the right direction by arming themselves with hay and feed analysis information, because they now realize it results in improved diet formulation decisions,” said the lab’s Forage Laboratory Chemist Michael J. Reuter. “Evidence that owners are embracing change is reflected in the number of samples processed at our lab. What began in 2004 with 1,000 samples now has evolved to over 7,000 annually and still growing.”

Test offerings at Equi-Analytical Laboratories www.equi-analytical.com range from $7 to $79. The cost of the “Fast Track” testing package is $18. The non-structural carbohydrate percentage in the sample tested (water soluble carbohydrates plus starch) is 5.9 percent as fed and 6.2 percent as dry matter. (See image.)

Watts believes a great opportunity exists to match low-carb hay with horse owners desperate to care for animals with special diet needs.

“I think we can fix the problem by making the hay more available, somehow, someway,” Watts said. “I believe veterinarians could even be a part of closing the gap. They could market tested, low-carb hay for horse clients, the same way they market specialty diets in their office for sick dogs. It’s adding value to the hay.”

Judd suggested veterinarians can serve as a resource for clients, referring them to hay growers who have the kind of hay they need for their horses.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Wanted%3A+Low-Carb+Nutrition+for+Horses+with+Special+Diet+Needs/2629374/354594/article.html.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here