Texas Agriculture August 5, 2016 : Page 14

By Julie Tomascik Associate Editor Steeped in family history lies a pas-sion for the land and livestock. And it’s the driving force behind Dave Ed-miston’s lifelong career in agriculture. “The land is very special when you farm or ranch, because it’s how you make a living,” Edmiston said. “If you love the land, respect the land, understand what the land can do and not push it to the outer lim-its, it will take care of you.” That family land is located just outside of Brady on the outskirts of the Texas Hill Country. Agriculture has been in Edmiston’s family since the 1800s when his ancestors first moved to the Lone Star State. Two centuries later, the grand-son of those ranching pioneers is the 39th recipient of the National Gold-en Spur Award, the most prestigious honor given by the ranching and livestock industries in recognition of accomplishments by an individual. “When you grow up with a place that was loved by two generations before, you learn to respect and love what you have,” Edmiston said. He and his wife, Peggy, have 14 raised their two daughters—Mi-chelle and Celeste—in the family’s agricultural traditions. They raised sheep, goats and cattle. They rode horses and spent many cool nights managing the wildlife population. Edmiston was a natural born leader. He was a teacher and a coach for many years, inspiring young ath-letes on and off the field. As an offensive coordinator, track coach and athletic director, Edmis-ton knew the importance of passion, dedication and discipline. A strong work ethic and perseverance were needed, too. He applied each of those attributes to agriculture. “You learn a lot of discipline as far as coaching is concerned,” he said. “To have great teams, you have to have great people around you—everyone going forward with the same goal.” For Edmiston, that goal in agri-culture is promoting beef and bring-ing profitability back to ranchers. Although he coached and taught for more than 30 years, Edmiston never really left the ranch. He spent weekends and summers checking cows, mending fences and making decisions. He helped market the cat-tle and stayed active in agricultural organizations. When he officially came back to the ranch full-time in 2003, Edmiston tackled the day-to-day ranching du-ties alongside his brother. He worked tirelessly, and still does, to improve the operation. He brought new ideas and renewed life to old ones. But Edmiston still wanted to do more. He wanted to have an active role in the decisions that affect the cattle busi-ness—the business he grew up in and his fam-ily’s livelihood. So he stepped beyond the fences that border his ranch. Edmiston left McCulloch County to walk the halls of Austin and Washington, D.C. He testified on issues he was passionate about, served on numerous committees and shared his agricul-tural story. “I think they need to hear our story. And what better individuals to tell Peggy and Dave, Golden Spur Award recipient, the story of ranching or have a ranch outside of Brady. Edmiston is the farming than those who third generation of his family on the ranch. are involved in it,” Edmiston said. “I feel like there were other people be-fore my time who stepped up to the plate and did that. It’s my time to do what I can for those who come behind me who will have the opportunity and freedoms and those property rights that I experienced and so loved.” He brought credibility, knowledge and passion to the conversations. He built meaningful, lasting relation-ships. And became a resource for young farmers and ranchers. He also helped shape the future of Texas beef. Edmiston was at the helm of the Texas Beef Council during a time of substantial change and progress— the Texas Beef Checkoff. He served as a McCulloch County Farm Bureau leader and later as a state director for District 7 and vice president of the state’s largest farm and ranch organization. Edmiston also served on the Cat-tlemen’s Beef Board in several capac-ities and is serving his sixth and final term on the Texas Beef Council and the Beef Promotion and Research Council of Texas boards of directors. This year’s winner of the presti-gious Golden Spur Award knows the value of beef and agriculture. And works to share it with others—both consumers and ranchers. A UGUST 5 , 2016

Legacy, Leadership and the Land

Julie Tomascik

Steeped in family history lies a passion for the land and livestock. And it’s the driving force behind Dave Edmiston’s lifelong career in agriculture.

“The land is very special when you farm or ranch, because it’s how you make a living,” Edmiston said. “If you love the land, respect the land, understand what the land can do and not push it to the outer limits, it will take care of you.”

That family land is located just outside of Brady on the outskirts of the Texas Hill Country. Agriculture has been in Edmiston’s family since the 1800s when his ancestors first moved to the Lone Star State.

Two centuries later, the grandson of those ranching pioneers is the 39th recipient of the National Golden Spur Award, the most prestigious honor given by the ranching and livestock industries in recognition of accomplishments by an individual.

“When you grow up with a place that was loved by two generations before, you learn to respect and love what you have,” Edmiston said.

He and his wife, Peggy, have raised their two daughters—Michelle and Celeste—in the family’s agricultural traditions. They raised sheep, goats and cattle. They rode horses and spent many cool nights managing the wildlife population.

Edmiston was a natural born leader. He was a teacher and a coach for many years, inspiring young athletes on and off the field.

As an offensive coordinator, track coach and athletic director, Edmiston knew the importance of passion, dedication and discipline. A strong work ethic and perseverance were needed, too. He applied each of those attributes to agriculture.

“You learn a lot of discipline as far as coaching is concerned,” he said. “To have great teams, you have to have great people around you—everyone going forward with the same goal.”

For Edmiston, that goal in agriculture is promoting beef and bringing profitability back to ranchers.

Although he coached and taught for more than 30 years, Edmiston never really left the ranch. He spent weekends and summers checking cows, mending fences and making decisions. He helped market the cattle and stayed active in agricultural organizations.

When he officially came back to the ranch full-time in 2003, Edmiston tackled the day-to-day ranching duties alongside his brother. He worked tirelessly, and still does, to improve the operation. He brought new ideas and renewed life to old ones.

But Edmiston still wanted to do more. He wanted to have an active role in the decisions that affect the cattle business—the business he grew up in and his family’s livelihood.

So he stepped beyond the fences that border his ranch. Edmiston left McCulloch County to walk the halls of Austin and Washington, D.C. He testified on issues he was passionate about, served on numerous committees and shared his agricultural story.

“I think they need to hear our story. And what better individuals to tell the story of ranching or farming than those who are involved in it,” Edmiston said. “I feel like there were other people before my time who stepped up to the plate and did that. It’s my time to do what I can for those who come behind me who will have the opportunity and freedoms and those property rights that I experienced and so loved.”

He brought credibility, knowledge and passion to the conversations. He built meaningful, lasting relationships. And became a resource for young farmers and ranchers.

He also helped shape the future of Texas beef.

Edmiston was at the helm of the Texas Beef Council during a time of substantial change and progress—the Texas Beef Checkoff.

He served as a McCulloch County Farm Bureau leader and later as a state director for District 7 and vice president of the state’s largest farm and ranch organization.

Edmiston also served on the Cattlemen’s Beef Board in several capacities and is serving his sixth and final term on the Texas Beef Council and the Beef Promotion and Research Council of Texas boards of directors.

This year’s winner of the prestigious Golden Spur Award knows the value of beef and agriculture. And works to share it with others—both consumers and ranchers.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Legacy%2C+Leadership+and+the+Land/2551918/326435/article.html.

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