Texas Agriculture August 5, 2016 : Page 12

Farming as family By Jessica Domel News Editor Working with family isn’t always easy, but it’s worth it. For years, Wilbarger County farmers Dan, Clint and Colby White have planted seeds, nourished their growth and celebrated their success together. For Dan, this year’s crop will be his 61st, but he’s growing more than peanuts, guar, wheat and cotton. He’s cultivating a legacy that be-gan three generations before him. “I started with a two-row with my dad. We built eight-row equip-ment in 1970. My dad was the first one in Wilbarger County to use four-row equipment,” Dan said. “He made that himself.” When Dan started in 1955, the year he and wife Sheila married, he planted 45 acres of wheat using his father’s equipment, but paying for the fuel himself. Now, six decades later, the tradi-tion is passing on to the next genera-tions. Dan and his son, Clint, and his grandson, Colby, share equipment, but maintain both shared and indi-vidual operations. “You’re able to share all of the mistakes, all of the different crop periods and different farming condi-tions with them that they’ve never experienced. That really helps out,” Dan said. While farming with family can pose certain challenges, like differ-ences in opinion, it’s also a great op-portunity, according to Clint. “It’s really a blessing to be able to work with him. When Colby was of age, we kind of did the same thing. My grandad was still here, and we’ve been able to do that,” Clint said. “It’s been really nice to be able The White family harvests wheat near White City. They also grow peanuts, guar and cotton. Clint, Colby and Dan White check seed depth after planting. A UGUST 5 , 2016 A TRACTOR THAT LOVES THE LAND AS MUCH AS YOU DO. The new Massey Ferguson ® 4600M Series raises the bar again on utility tractors. These popular tractors are perfect for hay, dairy, livestock and mixed-use farm operations, as well as landscapers and large property owners. They breeze through mowing and loader work, while maneuvering easily around the barn. And with their innovative power shuttle transmission and new deluxe cab option, even the longest days will be more productive and comfortable. www.masseyferguson.us to work with him. We all have our different opinions, but we get along really well.” The trio doesn’t really have as-signed roles when it comes to farm work. They work together like a well-oiled machine to ensure every chore—no matter how big or small— gets done. FIBERGLASS STOCK TANKS FROM MASSEY FERGUSON Massey Ferguson is a worldwide brand of AGCO. A world of experience. Working with you. Check out the Massey Ferguson 4600M Series At: DELEON COMANCHE COUNTY TRACTOR INC. 254-893-6711 LOW RATE FINANCING DONNA SEIVER IMPLEMENT COMPANY 956-464-3162 SEGUIN DIETZ TRACTOR COMPANY 830-401-0000 VICTORIA VICTORIA FARM EQ. CO, INC. 361-573-2497 VICTORIAFARMEQ.COM ‡ Will never rust or corrode USEFUL LIFE of OVER ‡ Light and easy to relocate ‡ Anti-skid, non-slip bottom for cattle safety ‡ Float box products available for constant water level ‡ Tapered wall to alleviate cracking due to ice ‡ Authorized for use in the NRCS cost sharing program PO Box 31240 511 West 48th Ave Amarillo, TX 79110 20 YEARS Power Pipe and Tank LLC For pricing call: 806-373-7418 Or email: www.powerpipeandtank.com infoRFQquotes@powerpipeandtank.com 12 ©2015 AGCO Corporation. AGCO is a registered trademark of AGCO. Massey Ferguson ® , MF ® , the triple triangle logo ® , is a worldwide brand of AGCO. All rights reserved. MF15P086CR Power, Pipe and Tank, LLC. was formerly Mur-Tex Fiberglass Same great products you’ve come to trust -just a new name!

Farming as Family

Jessica Domel

Working with family isn’t always easy, but it’s worth it.

For years, Wilbarger County farmers Dan, Clint and Colby White have planted seeds, nourished their growth and celebrated their success together.

For Dan, this year’s crop will be his 61st, but he’s growing more than peanuts, guar, wheat and cotton.

He’s cultivating a legacy that began three generations before him.

“I started with a two-row with my dad. We built eight-row equipment in 1970. My dad was the first one in Wilbarger County to use fourrow equipment,” Dan said. “He made that himself.”

When Dan started in 1955, the year he and wife Sheila married, he planted 45 acres of wheat using his father’s equipment, but paying for the fuel himself.

Now, six decades later, the tradition is passing on to the next generations.

Dan and his son, Clint, and his grandson, Colby, share equipment, but maintain both shared and individual operations.

“You’re able to share all of the mistakes, all of the different crop periods and different farming conditions with them that they’ve never experienced. That really helps out,” Dan said.

While farming with family can pose certain challenges, like differences in opinion, it’s also a great opportunity, according to Clint.

“It’s really a blessing to be able to work with him. When Colby was of age, we kind of did the same thing. My grandad was still here, and we’ve been able to do that,” Clint said. “It’s been really nice to be able to work with him. We all have our different opinions, but we get along really well.”

The trio doesn’t really have assigned roles when it comes to farm work.

They work together like a well-oiled machine to ensure every chore—no matter how big or small—gets done.

“We rely on each other. There are times that I need to be at a meeting or serve on another board,” Clint said. “I’ve got meetings here and there. Then, either my dad or Colby will keep checking the water or whatever. We fill in for each other.”

Working together and being a sixth generation farmer is something Colby takes pride in. He said it’s a blessing he hopes will continue with future generations.

“With the average age of the farmer getting older and older by the year, somebody’s got to do it. We need to keep those future generations coming back. We’ve got to produce food to feed the world,” Colby said. “It’s important for us to come back and do our part in that.”

Colby and his wife, Allison, are expecting a baby girl soon.

He said while he won’t push his little girl to farm, he will involve her if she’s interested.

Dan, Clint and Colby all believe farming is a calling and a passion—it’s one all three chose for themselves and their families in the small community of White City near Vernon.

“I farmed a few years,” Dan said. “I finally realized that God called me to be a farmer. That’s what I’ve done all my life. It’s rewarding. It’s helping others and serving our fellow man.”

All three currently serve on the Wilbarger County Farm Bureau board of directors.

Dan, who has been a Farm Bureau member since 1955, joined his county board in 1958 and has served since then.

Clint followed in 1990.

“I had a good friend, who is a state director now, Michael White, encourage me to come and be a part of this,” Clint said. “I came to a few meetings and felt the organization was going on the right track as far as being in favor of the farmer and rancher and looking out for their best interests.”

Colby, who grew up going to Farm Bureau meetings, said it’s a blessing to be able to serve with his father and grandfather.

He said it’s something he hopes he’ll one day be able to do with his daughter.

“I think it’s important to serve in your community and be an advocate for agriculture. It’s always a good thing. We need that,” Colby said.

In addition to Clint, Dan and Sheila have four other children: Shalan, Curt, Quesa and Rochelle.

“I hope to leave a legacy. I have two here who will carry the legacy on,” Dan said. “They’re trained well to take care of the land. If we take care of the land, the land will take care of us.”

Clint and Amy have four children: Colby, Kaylee Gruhlkey, Kelsey and Carli.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Farming+as+Family/2551913/326435/article.html.

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