Texas Agriculture March 4, 2016 : Page 6

The path to leadership Richmond, Frazier to help lead TFB By Julie Tomascik Associate Editor Different, yet similar. Leaders in agriculture are innovative, passion-ate and a strong voice for others. And new Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) State Directors Jessica Richmond, District 7, and Scott Frazier, District 13, are no exception. A Comanche County rancher, Rich-mond has deep roots in agriculture. She and her husband, Cade, raise re-placement heifers, irrigated Bermuda hay and small grains. They also own a farm and ranch real estate company. “I’ve always loved the outdoors,” Richmond said. “But when I started taking high school agriculture classes, I really became interested in the busi-ness and economic aspects.” It’s a passion that stuck. Richmond graduated with her Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Leadership from Texas A&M Univer-sity and her Master of Science in Ag-ricultural and Consumer Resources from Tarleton State University. Both degrees had an emphasis in Agricul-tural Economics. “I grew up around entrepreneurs,” Richmond said. “I watched my grand-parents working on their small farm and knew that marketing and eco-nomics were going to play a role in ag-riculture’s future and in mine.” Richmond was right. She now han-dles the marketing for their cattle, hay and real estate company. But her job doesn’t stop there. She homeschools their three chil-dren—Sterling, Jackson and Lillie. And she’s active in Farm Bureau. The couple served on TFB’s Young Farmer & Rancher Advisory Com-mittee and continue to attend YF&R events throughout the year. She was named TFB’s Young Farmer & Ranch-er Discussion Meet winner in 2011 and Outstanding Young Farmer & Rancher winner in 2014 with her husband. She also helps with Comanche County Farm Bureau ag days and Cade serves on the board. But being a part of agriculture and growing into active leaders didn’t hap-pen overnight. “We’ve made sacrifices and faced many struggles, but we’ve always stuck with it. It’s made us a success-ful team in agriculture and in the business world,” Richmond said. “We work to seek and create markets and spent a lot of time thinking creative-ly how we can be price makers and not price takers.” She wants to take that determina-tion and apply it to her longtime fu-ture in agriculture and on the TFB state board of directors. “Texas Farm Bureau is a strong voice for farmers and ranchers. I look forward to being a part of our growth and influence on agriculture as a whole,” Richmond said. Over in Nueces County, Frazier was always interested in agriculture. At the ripe old age of seven, he was raking hay, making the first of many rounds behind a tractor wheel. Later, he was active in the show ring, which introduced him to new friends and a future role as a volunteer. “I liked anything that was outdoors and still do,” he said. “Agriculture has been my passion and always been a part of my life.” He took that passion to college where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education from Texas A&M University. Shortly after that, Frazier went back to the farm. “When people ask why I chose to farm and ranch, I tell them it beats having a real job,” Frazier said. “As a little kid, I farmed with my toys. Now, I do the same thing. Except the toys are a little bigger and it’s a real field instead of the living room floor.” He grows cotton, grain sorghum, corn and wheat and has a commercial Jessica Richmond Scott Frazier cow-calf operation. Some years have been challenging. Others have been exhilarating. But the constant change hasn’t thwarted Frazier. “Markets don’t always go the way you’d like, and we’ve had some really dry years,” he said. “Each year has its own set of challenges, and the next few years could be really tough. But I’m still going and plan to keep going.” That determination stems from those who surrounded him grow-ing up. Family and volunteer leaders helping at stock shows, rodeos and other events were an inspiration. One he now models for others. Frazier has been on the Nueces County Junior Livestock Show board of directors for more than 15 years, serving as president for three. “There were always people in the background willing to help me and others,” he said. “Being on the county fair board and working with our local youth is my way of giving back.” He’s also served on the London Independent School District board of trustees for more than 15 years and is currently serving in his tenth year as president. But his work doesn’t end there. He’s active in Nueces County Farm Bureau and previously served as president for more than eight years. He’s served on numerous committees on the county and state levels, including TFB’s Agricultural Risk Mitigation Committee. Frazier and his wife, Kacy, have one daughter, Erin. She and her husband, Brian Kennedy, have one son. They’re his supporters and his motivation. And as he embarks on his term as a TFB state director, Frazier is look-ing forward to meeting TFB mem-bers and working toward a better future for agriculture. “Being on the state board will allow me to talk with farmers and ranchers across the state and nation,” he said. “I’ll be able to learn from them and their different operations—vegeta-bles, other commodities and ranching endeavors.” Because they all face challenges and all are looking for similar solu-tions to stop increased regulations and ensure the rural way of life re-mains viable. “We might have different opera-tions, but we’re going to face many of the same obstacles. Sharing ideas and solutions can help us all grow togeth-er,” Frazier said. “By working together with farmers and ranchers across the state and with my fellow board mem-bers, we’ll continue to make Texas Farm Bureau better and stronger.” TFB’s new leaders will build from the past and stretch to the future to ensure Texas agriculture stays strong and to tackle issues outside the farm gate. 6 M ARCH 4, 2016

The Path to Leadership

Julie Tomascik

Richmond, Frazier to help lead TFB

Different, yet similar. Leaders in agriculture are innovative, passionate and a strong voice for others. And new Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) State Directors Jessica Richmond, District 7, and Scott Frazier, District 13, are no exception.

A Comanche County rancher, Richmond has deep roots in agriculture. She and her husband, Cade, raise replacement heifers, irrigated Bermuda hay and small grains.

They also own a farm and ranch real estate company.

“I’ve always loved the outdoors,” Richmond said. “But when I started taking high school agriculture classes, I really became interested in the business and economic aspects.”

It’s a passion that stuck.

Richmond graduated with her Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Leadership from Texas A&M University and her Master of Science in Agricultural and Consumer Resources from Tarleton State University. Both degrees had an emphasis in Agricultural Economics.

“I grew up around entrepreneurs,” Richmond said. “I watched my grandparents working on their small farm and knew that marketing and economics were going to play a role in agriculture’s future and in mine.”

Richmond was right. She now handles the marketing for their cattle, hay and real estate company.

But her job doesn’t stop there.

She homeschools their three children—Sterling, Jackson and Lillie. And she’s active in Farm Bureau.

The couple served on TFB’s Young Farmer & Rancher Advisory Committee and continue to attend YF&R events throughout the year. She was named TFB’s Young Farmer & Rancher Discussion Meet winner in 2011 and Outstanding Young Farmer & Rancher winner in 2014 with her husband.

She also helps with Comanche County Farm Bureau ag days and Cade serves on the board.

But being a part of agriculture and growing into active leaders didn’t happen overnight.

“We’ve made sacrifices and faced many struggles, but we’ve always stuck with it. It’s made us a successful team in agriculture and in the business world,” Richmond said. “We work to seek and create markets and spent a lot of time thinking creatively how we can be price makers and not price takers.”

She wants to take that determination and apply it to her longtime future in agriculture and on the TFB state board of directors.

“Texas Farm Bureau is a strong voice for farmers and ranchers. I look forward to being a part of our growth and influence on agriculture as a whole,” Richmond said.

Over in Nueces County, Frazier was always interested in agriculture.

At the ripe old age of seven, he was raking hay, making the first of many rounds behind a tractor wheel.

Later, he was active in the show ring, which introduced him to new friends and a future role as a volunteer.

“I liked anything that was outdoors and still do,” he said. “Agriculture has been my passion and always been a part of my life.”

He took that passion to college where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education from Texas A&M University.

Shortly after that, Frazier went back to the farm.

“When people ask why I chose to farm and ranch, I tell them it beats having a real job,” Frazier said. “As a little kid, I farmed with my toys. Now, I do the same thing. Except the toys are a little bigger and it’s a real field instead of the living room floor.”

He grows cotton, grain sorghum, corn and wheat and has a commercial cow-calf operation.

Some years have been challenging. Others have been exhilarating. But the constant change hasn’t thwarted Frazier.

“Markets don’t always go the way you’d like, and we’ve had some really dry years,” he said. “Each year has its own set of challenges, and the next few years could be really tough. But I’m still going and plan to keep going.”

That determination stems from those who surrounded him growing up. Family and volunteer leaders helping at stock shows, rodeos and other events were an inspiration. One he now models for others.

Frazier has been on the Nueces County Junior Livestock Show board of directors for more than 15 years, serving as president for three.

“There were always people in the background willing to help me and others,” he said. “Being on the county fair board and working with our local youth is my way of giving back.”

He’s also served on the London Independent School District board of trustees for more than 15 years and is currently serving in his tenth year as president.

But his work doesn’t end there.

He’s active in Nueces County Farm Bureau and previously served as president for more than eight years. He’s served on numerous committees on the county and state levels, including TFB’s Agricultural Risk Mitigation Committee.

Frazier and his wife, Kacy, have one daughter, Erin. She and her husband, Brian Kennedy, have one son. They’re his supporters and his motivation.

And as he embarks on his term as a TFB state director, Frazier is looking forward to meeting TFB members and working toward a better future for agriculture.

“Being on the state board will allow me to talk with farmers and ranchers across the state and nation,” he said. “I’ll be able to learn from them and their different operations—vegetables, other commodities and ranching endeavors.”

Because they all face challenges and all are looking for similar solutions to stop increased regulations and ensure the rural way of life remains viable.

“We might have different operations, but we’re going to face many of the same obstacles. Sharing ideas and solutions can help us all grow together,” Frazier said. “By working together with farmers and ranchers across the state and with my fellow board members, we’ll continue to make Texas Farm Bureau better and stronger.”

TFB’s new leaders will build from the past and stretch to the future to ensure Texas agriculture stays strong and to tackle issues outside the farm gate.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/The+Path+to+Leadership/2414778/292602/article.html.

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