Texas Agriculture February 5, 2016 : Page 8

President vetoes legislation, keeps WOTUS rule In a long shot attempt to force the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to redefi ne its Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule, the U.S. Sen-ate failed with efforts to override President Barack Obama’s veto of a joint resolution seeking to nullify the rule. The Senate vote to invoke cloture passed 52-40, short of the 60 votes required to stop debate and proceed to a vote. The joint resolution seeks to nulli-fy the WOTUS rule submitted by the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers. It would also require them to redefi ne WOTUS under the Clean Water Act. Neither the House nor the Senate passed the resolution with the two-thirds majority that is required to override a presidential veto. Opponents to the rule say WO-TUS is a power grab by EPA and al-lows it to claim authority over bod-ies of water that, in the past, were not overseen by EPA like ditches and ephemeral streams. By claiming regulatory authority over those bod-ies, the EPA could force landowners, like farmers and ranchers, to obtain permits to do any work on or around land that falls under EPA jurisdic-tion through WOTUS. Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) and other agricultural groups have ar-gued the rule gives EPA and Corps of Engineers broad control over land use and farming practices. American Farm Bureau Federa-tion President Zippy Duvall calls the president’s veto “salt in farmers’ wounds.” “The Government Accountability Offi ce found the rule was issued with the help of illegal ‘covert propagan-da’ by EPA. Ninety-two members of Congress, 22 states, numerous cities and counties and dozens of industry groups have all stood up and said no to this rule. Courts have ordered the rule temporarily halted because of the harm it will cause. But, some-how, the president and the EPA just keep pushing. But we won’t stop ei-ther. We will not rest until this rule is gone,” Duvall said in a statement. EPA claims WOTUS is needed to protect U.S. waterways. For now, EPA’s implementation of WOTUS is on hold as numerous lawsuits, including one fi led by TFB and the Matagorda County Farm Bureau, are considered. It is unclear how long the stay will be in effect. REDESIGNED WITH YOU IN MIND Elevated rainfall through May? A further strengthening of the cur-rent El Niño will likely mean wetter-than-normal conditions continue into spring, according to Dr. John Nielsen-Gammon, state climatologist and re-gents professor at Texas A&M Uni-versity, College Station. This means the wet winter is going to more than likely continue for anoth-er few months, with elevated chances of rain through May, especially in the northern part of Texas, he said. As for summer conditions, long-range predictions are always a gam-ble. But there is some evidence that the current super-strong El Niño will be followed by its counterpoint, a strong La Niña, which could mean next winter will be dry. “Summer in Texas is always a roll of the dice or a fl ip of a coin, but next winter is almost certainly not going to be as wet as this winter has been. It could be a dry winter if La Niña does develop this fall,” he said. VSL 200 SERIES VERTICAL MAXX ® SINGLE-AUGER MIXERS F EBRUARY 5, 2016 INVEST IN QUALITY® r(CUVGT&#0e;OQTGGXGPOKZKPICPFWPNQCFKPIYKVJPGYEQPGCWIGTCPFUETCRGT r'CU[UMKFUVGGTNQCFKPIFWGVQVJGNQY&#0f;RTQHKNGFGUKIP r(TQPV&#0e;UKFGCPFTGCTFQQTQRVKQPURTQXKFGXGTUCVKNKV[HQTCP[HGGFKPIQRGTCVKQP EW
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Elevated Rainfall Through May?

A further strengthening of the current El Niño will likely mean wetterthan-normal conditions continue into spring, according to Dr. John Nielsen-ammon, state climatologist and regents professor at Texas A&M University, College Station.

This means the wet winter is going to more than likely continue for another few months, with elevated chances of rain through May, especially in the northern part of Texas, he said.

As for summer conditions, longrange predictions are always a gamble. But there is some evidence that the current super-strong El Niño will be followed by its counterpoint, a strong La Niña, which could mean next winter will be dry.

“Summer in Texas is always a roll of the dice or a flip of a coin, but next winter is almost certainly not going to be as wet as this winter has been. It could be a dry winter if La Niña does develop this fall,” he said.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Elevated+Rainfall+Through+May%3F/2389208/289677/article.html.

President Vetoes Legislation, Keeps WOTUS Rule

In a long shot attempt to force the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to redefine its Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule, the U.S. Senate failed with efforts to override President Barack Obama’s veto of a joint resolution seeking to nullify the rule. The Senate vote to invoke cloture passed 52-40, short of the 60 votes required to stop debate and proceed to a vote.

The joint resolution seeks to nullify the WOTUS rule submitted by the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers. It would also require them to redefine WOTUS under the Clean Water Act.

Neither the House nor the Senate passed the resolution with the two-thirds majority that is required to override a presidential veto.

Opponents to the rule say WOTUS is a power grab by EPA and allows it to claim authority over bodies of water that, in the past, were not overseen by EPA like ditches and ephemeral streams. By claiming regulatory authority over those bodies, the EPA could force landowners, like farmers and ranchers, to obtain permits to do any work on or around land that falls under EPA jurisdiction through WOTUS.

Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) and other agricultural groups have argued the rule gives EPA and Corps of Engineers broad control over land use and farming practices.

American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall calls the president’s veto “salt in farmers’ wounds.”

“The Government Accountability Office found the rule was issued with the help of illegal ‘covert propaganda’ by EPA. Ninety-two members of Congress, 22 states, numerous cities and counties and dozens of industry groups have all stood up and said no to this rule. Courts have ordered the rule temporarily halted because of the harm it will cause. But, somehow, the president and the EPA just keep pushing. But we won’t stop either. We will not rest until this rule is gone,” Duvall said in a statement.

EPA claims WOTUS is needed to protect U.S. waterways.

For now, EPA’s implementation of WOTUS is on hold as numerous lawsuits, including one filed by TFB and the Matagorda County Farm Bureau, are considered.

It is unclear how long the stay will be in effect.

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/President+Vetoes+Legislation%2C+Keeps+WOTUS+Rule/2389209/289677/article.html.

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