Texas Agriculture January 15, 2016 : Page 18

State attorney generals petition Supreme Court A group of 22 state attorney gener-als has petitioned the Supreme Court seeking a review of a lower court’s decision that lets the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) trump state rights to regulate runoff from farm-land and other sources. The attorney generals argue EPA’s Waters of the United States (WOTUS) and Chesapeake Bay Management rules amount to micromanaging nu-trient and sediment runoff, saying the EPA “unilaterally granted itself the power to make thousands of land-use decisions that have traditionally been, and should remain, state decisions.” Source: Doane’s Agricultural Report; Dec. 29, 2015 Anyone who purchased a drone af-ter Dec. 21, 2015 must register before their first outdoor flight. Operators will receive a unique identification number, valid for three years, which must be marked on the drone. Operators who fail to register could suffer civil penalties up to $27,500 and criminal penalties up to $250,000 and imprisonment of up to three years. Source: Doane’s Agricultural Report; Dec. 29, 2015 that control with the state Railroad Commission. Specifically, the bill prohibits any local regulations banning, limiting or otherwise regulating oil and gas activities subject to a narrow excep-tion for above ground activities (i.e. traffic, noise) if the regulation is com-mercially reasonable and does not effectively prohibit production. Source: Texas Agriculture Law; Dec. 22, 2015 Understanding the food democracy movement Resentment of the role large cor-porations play in food is at the core of the food democracy movement. Although there is no need to adopt a single definition of food democracy, the Pesticide Action Network (PAN) North America organization provides one of the better descriptions. Does it seek healthy food for all? Check. A cleaner environment? Check. Does it have a fondness Developing safe chemicals with less animal testing Recent years have seen increas-ingly stringent regulations applied for registration of agricultural chemi-cals and pharmaceutical, and the demand to increase human relevance of safety studies. For these reasons, Sumitomo Chemical and BASF plan to create a system that supports the develop-ment of safe chemicals, while reduc-ing the need for conventional animal testing. As the first step in their research, Sumitomo Chemical and BASF are seeking to establish a new line of fully functional cultured cells to enable the safety evaluation of chemicals in a more efficient and more precise way than conventional methods. Source: Doane’s Agricultural Report; Dec. 31, 2015 for local food? Check. Is the word “corporation” used as a pejorative? Check. Does it include the term “social justice,” just in case a cause you champion has not already been listed? Check. This movement emphasizes ful-fillment of the human right to safe, nutritious food that has been justly produced. It means ordinary people getting together to establish rules that encourage safeguarding the soil, water and wildlife on which we all depend. It is also pragmatic politics built around the difficult lesson that food is too important to leave to market forces. This push to re-localize control over food and farming in the United States has an international equiva-lent in the “food sovereignty” move-ment. Source: Choices and the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association; Dec. 31, 2015 Cutting edge not always profitable Agriculture continually seeks to become more efficient, and new technologies often create a path for doing so. But, as a recent study by Lux Research indicated, these inno-vations also need to generate a finan-cial return for farmers and ranchers. Although the newest machine or sensor may be available, it likely won’t be in demand if it doesn’t cut costs or increase revenues for farmers and ranchers. That’s why the cutting edge isn’t always profitable. Source: Doane’s Agricultural Report; Dec. 31, 2015 J ANUARY 15, 2016 Texas agriculture law year in review The Texas Legislature prohibits local oil and gas production bans in most circumstances. After Denton residents passed a bill prohibiting fracking in city limits, the Texas Legislature responded with House Bill 40. The bill, which was passed and signed by Governor Abbott, intends to preempt any local efforts to regu-late oil and gas production, leaving All UAS, drones must be registered The FAA recently announced that all small unmanned aircraft (UAS),or drones, must be registered. FAA of-ficials argue that all who fly drones are pilots and must be responsible. Existing UAS owners must regis-ter no later than Feb. 19, 2016. 18

Facts for You

Glen Jones

State attorney generals petition Supreme Court

A group of 22 state attorney generals has petitioned the Supreme Court seeking a review of a lower court’s decision that lets the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) trump state rights to regulate runoff from farmland and other sources.

The attorney generals argue EPA’s Waters of the United States (WOTUS) and Chesapeake Bay Management rules amount to micromanaging nutrient and sediment runoff, saying the EPA “unilaterally granted itself the power to make thousands of land-use decisions that have traditionally been, and should remain, state decisions.”

Source: Doane’s Agricultural Report;
Dec. 29, 2015

Cutting edge not always profitable

Agriculture continually seeks to become more efficient, and new technologies often create a path for doing so. But, as a recent study by Lux Research indicated, these innovations also need to generate a financial return for farmers and ranchers.

Although the newest machine or sensor may be available, it likely won’t be in demand if it doesn’t cut costs or increase revenues for farmers and ranchers.

That’s why the cutting edge isn’t always profitable.

Source: Doane’s Agricultural Report;
Dec. 31, 2015

All UAS, drones must be registered

The FAA recently announced that all small unmanned aircraft (UAS),or drones, must be registered. FAA officials argue that all who fly drones are pilots and must be responsible.

Existing UAS owners must register no later than Feb. 19, 2016.

Anyone who purchased a drone after Dec. 21, 2015 must register before their first outdoor flight.

Operators will receive a unique identification number, valid for three years, which must be marked on the drone. Operators who fail to register could suffer civil penalties up to $27,500 and criminal penalties up to $250,000 and imprisonment of up to three years.

Source: Doane’s Agricultural Report;
Dec. 29, 2015

Developing safe chemicals with less animal testing

Recent years have seen increasingly stringent regulations applied for registration of agricultural chemicals and pharmaceutical, and the demand to increase human relevance of safety studies.

For these reasons, Sumitomo Chemical and BASF plan to create a system that supports the development of safe chemicals, while reducing the need for conventional animal testing.

As the first step in their research, Sumitomo Chemical and BASF are seeking to establish a new line of fully functional cultured cells to enable the safety evaluation of chemicals in a more efficient and more precise way than conventional methods.

Source: Doane’s Agricultural Report;
Dec. 31, 2015

Texas agriculture law year in review

The Texas Legislature prohibits local oil and gas production bans in most circumstances. After Denton residents passed a bill prohibiting fracking in city limits, the Texas Legislature responded with House Bill 40.

The bill, which was passed and signed by Governor Abbott, intends to preempt any local efforts to regulate oil and gas production, leaving that control with the state Railroad Commission.

Specifically, the bill prohibits any local regulations banning, limiting or otherwise regulating oil and gas activities subject to a narrow exception for above ground activities (i.e. traffic, noise) if the regulation is commercially reasonable and does not effectively prohibit production.

Source: Texas Agriculture Law;
Dec. 22, 2015

Understanding the food democracy movement

Resentment of the role large corporations play in food is at the core of the food democracy movement.

Although there is no need to adopt a single definition of food democracy, the Pesticide Action Network (PAN) North America organization provides one of the better descriptions.

Does it seek healthy food for all? Check. A cleaner environment? Check. Does it have a fondness for local food? Check. Is the word “corporation” used as a pejorative? Check. Does it include the term “social justice,” just in case a cause you champion has not already been listed? Check.

This movement emphasizes fulfillment of the human right to safe, nutritious food that has been justly produced. It means ordinary people getting together to establish rules that encourage safeguarding the soil, water and wildlife on which we all depend.

It is also pragmatic politics built around the difficult lesson that food is too important to leave to market forces.

This push to re-localize control over food and farming in the United States has an international equivalent in the “food sovereignty” movement.

Source: Choices and the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association;
Dec. 31, 2015

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Facts+for+You/2370004/287396/article.html.

Texas Agriculture Talks

Using a screen reader? Click Here