Texas Agriculture November 6, 2015 : Page 4

Lamar County FB recognized EPA takes hit on Waters of the U.S. rule As the fight against the Environ-mental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) contin-ues in courtrooms across the nation, its implementation, for now at least, is on hold. In early October, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit issued a nationwide stay of WOTUS. “There have been multiple chal-lenges to this rule, including two put forth by Texas Farm Bureau,” Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) President Rus-sell Boening said. “We’re pleased the court has decided to stay the rule while these suits are sorted out. We hope it brings some clarity in an oth-erwise confusing situation.” The court’s decision puts the EPA’s and Corps of Engineers’ enforce-ment of the rule on hold until the legal system can determine who has jurisdiction over the lawsuits filed against WOTUS in District and Ap-pellate courts. When the rule was first imple-mented, a North Dakota judge ap-proved an injunction preventing enforcement of the rule. He further ruled the injunction only applied to the states that were party to the suit. Texas was not one of those states. “WOTUS has serious flaws. It’s a power grab by EPA that puts the live-lihoods of Texas farmers in jeopardy by forcing them to obtain permits to do otherwise legal farm activity in ar-eas that only sometimes hold water,” Boening said. It’s not clear how long the court’s temporary stay will remain in effect. The final rule became effective Aug. 28, expanding the scope of the federal government’s jurisdiction over waters under the Clean Water Act. In mid-October, a judicial panel denied the federal government’s re-quest to consolidate the dozen or so legal challenges to WOTUS. The panel cited complex judicial questions as the reason why the cases were unsuitable for consolidation. The individual cases, including those put forth by TFB, will continue on in their respective courts. IARC report has ranchers seeing red A new World Health Organization (WHO) study categorizes red and processed meats as potential car-cinogens, and it’s drawn critics from agriculture. The study, conducted by WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), designates processed meats—like bacon, sausage and hotdogs—as a “Group 1” carcinogen. That puts it alongside exposure to asbestos and tobacco. The study also concluded that red meat is “prob-ably” carcinogenic to humans, stating consumption could lead to colorectal cancer and possibly pancreatic and prostate cancers. “The report is a dramatic and alarmist approach,” said Tracy To-mascik, associate director of Com-modity and Regulatory Activities for Texas Farm Bureau. “The panel was not unanimous in its decision and re-lied on a majority opinion that doesn’t reflect the consensus in the scientific community.” The working group of 22 experts from 10 countries analyzed more than 800 existing studies on associations between types of cancer and red and processed meats. “But the findings IARC released didn’t take into account the other fac-tors involved—age, genetics, physical activity and socioeconomic character-istics,” Tomascik said. “It’s a confusing report that’s gaining traction in the media when it shouldn’t.” The panel’s report hits home in the Lone Star State, where beef exports brought in more than $800 million in 2012. But most consumers and inves-tors aren’t reading too heavily into the report. Stocks in meat companies slipped a little the day the report was released, but have steadied since. Farmers and ranchers didn’t take a big hit either. Futures prices steadied and trade resumed at normal rates. “Lean red meat is an important part of a well-balanced diet. It always has been and will continue to be,” Tomascik said. “I think consumers have an appetite for red meat—not just beef—that will remain strong.” A community mourning the loss of one of its own is being recognized by the American Farm Bureau Federa-tion for their work to prevent future on-farm deaths. Lamar County Farm Bureau has been named a winner in AFBF’s County Activities of Excellence (CAE) program. The county hosted a grain bin safety workshop in Paris, Texas in memory of a 32-year-old man who tragically lost his life in a grain bin accident. The workshop and informa-tional session was held to help local farmers and first responders learn how to act safely around silos and bins and also how to rescue someone who has become trapped. The county Farm Bureau raised funds for weeks to buy at least three grain bin rescue tubes for fire depart-ments in their area. Their goal was to hopefully prevent future losses like the one they experienced this year. In recognition of their work, rep-resentatives from Lamar CFB will travel to the 2016 AFBF Annual Convention and IDEAg Trade Show in Orlando, Fla. in January. There, they will have a display on farm safety for other Farm Bureau members from across the nation to see. The display will also be available at the Texas Farm Bureau Annual Meeting Dec. 5-7 in Arlington. N OVEMBER 6, 2015 Notable Quotables “Crop insurance is critical to the vast majority of farmers. Without affordable risk management, a drought like that we experienced in 2011 could have spelled the end for many farms and ranches across Texas. When farmers hurt, the rural economy hurts, too. We are disappointed in the cuts to the crop in-surance program—on top of the billions of dollars cut from agriculture’s critical safety net in the last farm bill.” — TFB President Russell Boening responds to a two-year budget agreement between congressional leaders and the White House on Oct. 27 that could contain a $3 billion cut to crop insurance. (See story, Page 16.) 4

AgriCurrents

EPA takes hit on Waters of the U.S. rule

As the fight against the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) continues in courtrooms across the nation, its implementation, for now at least, is on hold.

In early October, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit issued a nationwide stay of WOTUS.

“There have been multiple challenges to this rule, including two put forth by Texas Farm Bureau,” Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) President Russell Boening said. “We’re pleased the court has decided to stay the rule while these suits are sorted out. We hope it brings some clarity in an otherwise confusing situation.”

The court’s decision puts the EPA’s and Corps of Engineers’ enforcement of the rule on hold until the legal system can determine who has jurisdiction over the lawsuits filed against WOTUS in District and Appellate courts.

When the rule was first implemented, a North Dakota judge approved an injunction preventing enforcement of the rule.

He further ruled the injunction only applied to the states that were party to the suit.

Texas was not one of those states.

“WOTUS has serious flaws. It’s a power grab by EPA that puts the livelihoods of Texas farmers in jeopardy by forcing them to obtain permits to do otherwise legal farm activity in areas that only sometimes hold water,” Boening said.

It’s not clear how long the court’s temporary stay will remain in effect.

The final rule became effective Aug. 28, expanding the scope of the federal government’s jurisdiction over waters under the Clean Water Act.

In mid-October, a judicial panel denied the federal government’s request to consolidate the dozen or so legal challenges to WOTUS.

The panel cited complex judicial questions as the reason why the cases were unsuitable for consolidation.

The individual cases, including those put forth by TFB, will continue on in their respective courts.

IARC report has ranchers seeing red

A new World Health Organization (WHO) study categorizes red and processed meats as potential carcinogens, and it’s drawn critics from agriculture.

The study, conducted by WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), designates processed meats—like bacon, sausage and hotdogs—as a “Group 1” carcinogen. That puts it alongside exposure to asbestos and tobacco. The study also concluded that red meat is “probably” carcinogenic to humans, stating consumption could lead to colorectal cancer and possibly pancreatic and prostate cancers.

“The report is a dramatic and alarmist approach,” said Tracy Tomascik, associate director of Commodity and Regulatory Activities for Texas Farm Bureau. “The panel was not unanimous in its decision and relied on a majority opinion that doesn’t reflect the consensus in the scientific community.”

The working group of 22 experts from 10 countries analyzed more than 800 existing studies on associations between types of cancer and red and processed meats.

“But the findings IARC released didn’t take into account the other factors involved—age, genetics, physical activity and socioeconomic characteristics,” Tomascik said. “It’s a confusing report that’s gaining traction in the media when it shouldn’t.”

The panel’s report hits home in the Lone Star State, where beef exports brought in more than $800 million in 2012.

But most consumers and investors aren’t reading too heavily into the report.

Stocks in meat companies slipped a little the day the report was released, but have steadied since. Farmers and ranchers didn’t take a big hit either. Futures prices steadied and trade resumed at normal rates.

“Lean red meat is an important part of a well-balanced diet. It always has been and will continue to be,” Tomascik said. “I think consumers have an appetite for red meat—not just beef—that will remain strong.”

Lamar County FB recognized

A community mourning the loss of one of its own is being recognized by the American Farm Bureau Federation for their work to prevent future on-farm deaths.

Lamar County Farm Bureau has been named a winner in AFBF’s County Activities of Excellence (CAE) program.

The county hosted a grain bin safety workshop in Paris, Texas in memory of a 32-year-old man who tragically lost his life in a grain bin accident. The workshop and informational session was held to help local farmers and first responders learn how to act safely around silos and bins and also how to rescue someone who has become trapped.

The county Farm Bureau raised funds for weeks to buy at least three grain bin rescue tubes for fire departments in their area. Their goal was to hopefully prevent future losses like the one they experienced this year.

In recognition of their work, representatives from Lamar CFB will travel to the 2016 AFBF Annual Convention and IDEAg Trade Show in Orlando, Fla. in January.

There, they will have a display on farm safety for other Farm Bureau members from across the nation to see. The display will also be available at the Texas Farm Bureau Annual Meeting Dec. 5-7 in Arlington.

Notable Quotables

“Crop insurance is critical to the vast majority of farmers. Without affordable risk management, a drought like that we experienced in 2011 could have spelled the end for many farms and ranches across Texas. When farmers hurt, the rural economy hurts, too. We are disappointed in the cuts to the crop insurance program—on top of the billions of dollars cut from agriculture’s critical safety net in the last farm bill.”

TFB President Russell Boening responds to a two-year budget agreement between congressional leaders and the White House on Oct. 27 that could contain a $3 billion cut to crop insurance. (See story, Page 16.)

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/AgriCurrents/2318220/280024/article.html.

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