Texas Agriculture November 6, 2015 : Page 12

7)%DQQRXQFHV([FHOOHQFHLQ$JULFXOWXUHÀQDOLVWV Texas Farm Bureau Credit; a Polaris Ranger, (TFB) is once again honor-courtesy of Southern Farm ing three couples who go Bureau Life Insurance above and beyond to serve Company; a plaque rep-their communities, area resentative of the award; farmers and ranchers and transportation and two Farm Bureau. nights lodging and meals to The finalists in this the TFB Annual Meeting; year’s Excellence in Agri-and a $750 service voucher, culture (EIA) contest are: courtesy of Chevrolet. Cody and Erika Archie of The winner will also re-Gatesville, Scott and Sara ceive an expense-paid trip Scott and Sara Holloway Jake and Brandi Murphree Cody and Erika Archie Holloway of Bowie and to represent Texas at the Jake and Brandi Murphree national competition dur-Scott Holloway, 32, is a sales rep-Annual Meeting in Arlington Dec. of Hamilton. ing the American Farm Bureau Fed-resentative for an animal health and 5-7. TFB’s EIA award recognizes nutrition company, Alltech. Sara This year’s EIA runners-up will eration (AFBF) annual meeting Jan. young men and women who are in-Holloway, 34, is a mixed animal vet-receive: transportation and two 8-13 in Orlando, Fla. volved in agriculture but do not earn erinarian at Cross Timbers Veteri-nights lodging and meals to the TFB The winner of the AFBF EIA con-their primary income from a farm or nary Hospital. Annual Meeting; a power tool val-test will receive their choice of a 2016 ranch enterprise. Jake and Brandi Murphree, ages ued at $200, courtesy of Grainger; a Chevrolet Silverado or GMC Sierra Cody and Erika Archie, ages 35 32 and 34, own and operate Lone new pair of Justin Boots, courtesy of truck, courtesy of Chevrolet. and 34 respectively, own and oper-Star Liquids, Main Street Storage Justin Brands, Inc.; and a $500 cash The three national runners-up ate Valet Cleaners and Laundry in and Car Wash and other businesses award, courtesy of Southern Farm will receive a Case IH Farmall trac-Gatesville. Erika also works at the in Hamilton County. tor, courtesy of Case IH, as well as a Bureau Life Insurance Company. U.S. Department of Agriculture Ru-The state winner will receive: a $2,500 cash price and $500 in STIHL The winner of the TFB EIA con-ral Development office in Temple. test will be announced at the TFB $5,000 cash award, courtesy of Farm merchandise, courtesy of STIHL. Cody and Erika Archie Gatesville From sun up to sun down, the Ar-chie family’s faith and love for agri-culture shines through. During the day, Cody can be found running the family’s business, Valet Cleaners and Laundry, in Gatesville. “It’s a full-service dry cleaner and self-service coin laundry,” Cody said. “The majority of our income comes from that.” As customers come in to pick up their freshly cared-for clothes, they’re often warmly greeted by Cody and welcomed in like family. Erika works at the U.S. Depart-ment of Agriculture Rural Develop-ment office in Temple. But it’s what happens at the end of the day that truly brings the family together. They work cattle, ride horses and care for their nearly 100-acre ranch near Turnersville. “About three years ago, God blessed us and gave us the opportu-12 nity to buy the cleaners,” Cody said. “My cousin and I partnered on that. It allows us to spend more time out here on the ranch and let me do a few more things here I’d like to.” Although the cou-ple loves serving their community through the dry cleaners and laundry, Cody says his real heart is on Bar 7 Ranch, where they raise replace-ment heifers. The couple’s daugh-ter, Kylee, 11, has two show steers that she’s responsible for car-ing for daily. Both Kylee and her brother, Clancy, 6, help their parents out with the cattle and care for the horses they ride in junior rodeos on the weekend. “They ride barrels, poles, tie goats and they’re getting into calf roping,” Cody said. Cody and Erika keep their kids involved on the ranch to help teach them responsibility and to nurture a greater love for the outdoors and agri-culture. “We need the next generation of agriculture to be there,” Cody said. “It’s important to us to instill in them hard work eth-ics and know they have to work hard to get anything.” Erika harnesses the power of so-cial media to share their family’s life on the ranch. “I try to take pic-tures and post about things I think people might not be exposed to,” Er-ika said. Whether she’s posting photos of her kids riding, working cattle or even eating a steak, Erika strives to be a positive voice for agriculture on-line. “We’re very fortunate to have a place like this to live on and for our kids to grow up on,” Erika said. Erika also helps Cody market their cattle on the internet and handles so-cial media pages for her church, the Coryell County Farm Bureau and their business. No matter what they do, the Archies’ faith and passion shines through. They are both Sunday School teachers in their church. Cody is also a deacon. Both parents also help with their local 4-H clubs and serve on the Texas Farm Bureau Young Farmer & Rancher state committee. Cody also serves on the Coryell County Farm Bureau board of direc-tors. “Texas Farm Bureau is a great av-enue for farmers and ranchers to get to meet other people and learn from others,” Cody said. “It’s important for young farmers and ranchers to step up and be that voice of agriculture.” N OVEMBER 6, 2015

TFB Announces Excellence in Agriculture Finalists

Texas Farm Bureau (TFB) is once again honoring three couples who go above and beyond to serve their communities, area farmers and ranchers and Farm Bureau.

The finalists in this year’s Excellence in Agriculture (EIA) contest are: Cody and Erika Archie of Gatesville, Scott and Sara Holloway of Bowie and Jake and Brandi Murphree of Hamilton.

TFB’s EIA award recognizes young men and women who are involved in agriculture but do not earn their primary income from a farm or ranch enterprise.

Cody and Erika Archie, ages 35 and 34 respectively, own and operate Valet Cleaners and Laundry in Gatesville. Erika also works at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development office in Temple.

Scott Holloway, 32, is a sales representative for an animal health and nutrition company, Alltech. Sara Holloway, 34, is a mixed animal veterinarian at Cross Timbers Veterinary Hospital.

Jake and Brandi Murphree, ages 32 and 34, own and operate Lone Star Liquids, Main Street Storage and Car Wash and other businesses in Hamilton County.

The winner of the TFB EIA contest will be announced at the TFB Annual Meeting in Arlington Dec. 5-7.

This year’s EIA runners-up will receive: transportation and two nights lodging and meals to the TFB Annual Meeting; a power tool valued at $200, courtesy of Grainger; a new pair of Justin Boots, courtesy of Justin Brands, Inc.; and a $500 cash award, courtesy of Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company.

The state winner will receive: a $5,000 cash award, courtesy of Farm Credit; a Polaris Ranger, courtesy of Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company; a plaque representative of the award; transportation and two nights lodging and meals to the TFB Annual Meeting; and a $750 service voucher, courtesy of Chevrolet.

The winner will also receive an expense-paid trip to represent Texas at the national competition during the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) annual meeting Jan. 8-13 in Orlando, Fla.

The winner of the AFBF EIA contest will receive their choice of a 2016 Chevrolet Silverado or GMC Sierra truck, courtesy of Chevrolet.

The three national runners-up will receive a Case IH Farmall tractor, courtesy of Case IH, as well as a $2,500 cash price and $500 in STIHL merchandise, courtesy of STIHL.

Cody and Erika Archie

Gatesville

From sun up to sun down, the Archie family’s faith and love for agriculture shines through.

During the day, Cody can be found running the family’s business, Valet Cleaners and Laundry, in Gatesville.

“It’s a full-service dry cleaner and self-service coin laundry,” Cody said. “The majority of our income comes from that.”

As customers come in to pick up their freshly cared-for clothes, they’re often warmly greeted by Cody and welcomed in like family.

Erika works at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development office in Temple.

But it’s what happens at the end of the day that truly brings the family together.

They work cattle, ride horses and care for their nearly 100-acre ranch near Turnersville.

“About three years ago, God blessed us and gave us the opportunity to buy the cleaners,” Cody said. “My cousin and I partnered on that. It allows us to spend more time out here on the ranch and let me do a few more things here I’d like to.”

Although the couple loves serving their community through the dry cleaners and laundry, Cody says his real heart is on Bar 7 Ranch, where they raise replacement heifers.

The couple’s daughter, Kylee, 11, has two show steers that she’s responsible for caring for daily. Both Kylee and her brother, Clancy, 6, help their parents out with the cattle and care for the horses they ride in junior rodeos on the weekend.

“They ride barrels, poles, tie goats and they’re getting into calf roping,” Cody said.

Cody and Erika keep their kids involved on the ranch to help teach them responsibility and to nurture a greater love for the outdoors and agriculture.

“We need the next generation of agriculture to be there,” Cody said. “It’s important to us to instill in them hard work ethics and know they have to work hard to get anything.”

Erika harnesses the power of social media to share their family’s life on the ranch.

“I try to take pictures and post about things I think people might not be exposed to,” Erika said.

Whether she’s posting photos of her kids riding, working cattle or even eating a steak, Erika strives to be a positive voice for agriculture online.

“We’re very fortunate to have a place like this to live on and for our kids to grow up on,” Erika said.

Erika also helps Cody market their cattle on the internet and handles social media pages for her church, the Coryell County Farm Bureau and their business.

No matter what they do, the Archies’ faith and passion shines through. They are both Sunday School teachers in their church.

Cody is also a deacon.

Both parents also help with their local 4-H clubs and serve on the Texas Farm Bureau Young Farmer & Rancher state committee.

Cody also serves on the Coryell County Farm Bureau board of directors.

“Texas Farm Bureau is a great avenue for farmers and ranchers to get to meet other people and learn from others,” Cody said. “It’s important for young farmers and ranchers to step up and be that voice of agriculture.”

Scott and Sara Holloway

Bowie

During the day, they conquer their tasks with confidence and serve their agricultural community with skill. But at the end of each day, Scott and Sara Holloway come together with their son, Coleman, to care for their own cattle and spend time together as a family.

Scott is a dairy nutritionist and consultant for Alltech, an animal nutrition and health company. Sara is an associate veterinarian at a rural, mixed animal practice, Cross Timbers Veterinary Hospital in Bowie.

Scott has a true passion for the dairy industry and agriculture. He grew up working on his family’s dairy. When the family sold out last year due to difficulty in finding labor, he was determined to be involved in the dairy industry.

“It’s a blessing to carry on my passion for the dairy industry,” Scott said. “I want those producers to succeed just as much as they can.”

Scott conducts herd checks, feed audits, silage audits and other tests to help farmers, ranchers and dairymen know what’s going on in their operation.

As a veterinarian at a mixed animal practice, Sara treats everything with four legs and occasionally a snake or a bird.

“We’re all about the well-being of the animal. We do everything we can to make their life more comfortable,” Sara said.

Sara encourages preventative measures, like vaccines, to keep animals from becoming ill and works with farmers and ranchers to ensure the health of their animals.

But it’s not just about the animal. In some ways, what Sara does helps people as well.

“As far as dogs and cats go, they’ve become part of the family. It’s almost like I’m a pediatrician in some aspects because I’m taking care of little fluffy or sweet little kitty,” Sara said.

When they’re off the clock, Scott and Sara come together to share what they know individually to help care for the replacement dairy heifers and beef heifers they raise. They also have a cow/calf operation and grow wheat. Scott also does artificial insemination work for local ranchers.

And you can be sure, when they’re out checking the cows, the couple’s three-and-half-year-old son is right there with them.

“I grew up right alongside my dad working with him,” Scott said. “It was an amazing opportunity. I just want to have the same for Coleman.”

Sara works with the local FFA and helps to teach a veterinary technician class at the high school that enables students to earn a veterinary assistant certificate when they graduate.

Scott is a part of the FFA alumni group. He also helps the FFA dairy judging team and is involved in their county show.

“If anybody is interested in showing dairy, we’ll provide them a heifer,” Scott said. “I’ll help them get it ready for show.”

The couple is actively involved in their church.

Scott is vice president of the Montague County Farm Bureau board of directors.

“The Farm Bureau is a huge voice for agriculture in general. Being able to give back, serve on our board with others in this county and work together to help Farm Bureau in this county run well is something special,” Scott said.

Jake and Brandi Murphree

Hamilton

Whether they’re checking in on their businesses, serving on local committees or working out in the field, you can be sure of at least one thing—whatever the Murphrees are doing, they’re doing it with passion.

Jake and Brandi Murphree of Hamilton County show their love for agriculture and commitment to their community each and every day.

They do it by running businesses like Lone Star Liquids, B&J Cattle Company, Main Street Storage and Car Wash and by volunteering for the local county show, livestock association and county Farm Bureau.

“Every day brings a different set of challenges whether it’s going here or there or potentially staying somewhere all day,” Jake said.

At Main Street Storage and Car Wash, the couple provides facilities for people to store their valued possessions. They also work to ensure each and every bay at the car wash is in tip-top shape and ready for the people of Hamilton.

Through their business Lone Star Liquids, the couple is able to help other farmers and ranchers with their liquid fertilizer and custom application needs.

“We provide fertilization, weed and pest control,” Jake said. “We take soil samples if a producer requests them and send them off. Once we get those back, we can sit down and build a program together that their soil actually needs.”

Their cattle operation, B&J Cattle Company, includes a commercial set of Black Baldy cows bred to Wagyu bulls. The F1 Wagyu calves are marketed in different ways, including through a ranch-to-table food truck that serves Gatesville, Hamilton and surrounding areas.

“The meat is highly marbled and highly sought after,” Jake said.

No matter where each day takes them, Brandi and Jake work together as a team—even if they’re not at the same location.

“Usually when one thing is not working, something else picks up the slack,” Brandi said.

The couple volunteers with the Hamilton County Livestock Association and other organizations throughout the community. Jake is vice president of the Hamilton County Farm Bureau board of directors.

“I got involved with the Hamilton County Farm Bureau as a director because I wanted to become more involved in Farm Bureau’s relations with local youth activities,” Jake said. “We sponsor 4-H and FFA members as well.”

Jake and Brandi’s connection to youth comes not only from their experience as kids in those organizations, but also because they have two young boys themselves—Zeb, 5, and Jace, who was born in late August.

“It teaches responsibility. It teaches these kids where their food comes from and how it’s raised.” Brandi said

As for their own kids, they spend plenty of time in the fields with their mom and dad. But it’s more than that. Thanks to their dedication, Zeb and his brother will also grow up seeing their parents’ passion and commitment for their community.

“We were both raised here in Hamilton,” Brandi said. “We absolutely love our community. It’s a small town and we love it. We want our kids to love rural America. We want them to be able to come back.”

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/TFB+Announces+Excellence+in+Agriculture+Finalists/2318268/280024/article.html.

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