Texas Neighbors Spring 2015 : Page 8

TEXAS NEIGHBORS | SPRING 2015 ooming l B Texas Photos and Story by Mike Barnett Will it be a great wildflower year? Who knows? Much of the state has had plenty of rain, but did it fall at the right time? Cooler weather has delayed our spring show a bit, but Texas should start blooming! Thoughts automatically turn to bluebon -nets and paintbrush when it comes to Texas wildflowers. They blanket roadsides and pas -tures and absolutely glow in the right light. But there’s so much more. Like the grape hyacinth, featured on this page. Bees love it, but it’s not really wild. A native of Europe, the flower escaped from family gardens to populate lawns and road -sides. Our gain. Then there’s (opposite page, top left and clockwise) the Mexican Hat. Native Ameri -cans boiled the leaves and flowers to treat snakebite and poison ivy. Next is the showy bluebonnet. ’Nuff said. Don’t overlook the prickly pear. I see most -ly orange and yellow, but I hear they come in purple. Regardless, their flowers make a beautiful fruit. Jelly anyone? And the Drummond Phlox. This red wild -flower mixed with bluebonnets is absolutely stunning. Its seeds were shipped from Texas to Europe over 150 years ago where they are considered a prized exotic. Finally, a splash of yellow, Engelmann’s Daisy. Deer, cows and rabbits love it. A riot of color is about to blanket the Lone Star State. Are you ready? Get out and enjoy nature’s beauty as the days warm. There’s no place more beautiful than Texas in the spring! WWW.TEXASFARMBUREAU.ORG

Blooming Texas

Mike Barnett

Will it be a great wildflower year? Who knows? Much of the state has had plenty of rain, but did it fall at the right time? Cooler weather has delayed our spring show a bit, but Texas should start blooming!

Thoughts automatically turn to bluebonnets and paintbrush when it comes to Texas wildflowers. They blanket roadsides and pastures and absolutely glow in the right light. But there’s so much more.

Like the grape hyacinth, featured on this page. Bees love it, but it’s not really wild. A native of Europe, the flower escaped from family gardens to populate lawns and roadsides. Our gain.

Then there’s (opposite page, top left and clockwise) the Mexican Hat. Native Americans boiled the leaves and flowers to treat snakebite and poison ivy. Next is the showy bluebonnet. ’Nuff said.

Don’t overlook the prickly pear. I see mostly orange and yellow, but I hear they come in purple. Regardless, their flowers make a beautiful fruit. Jelly anyone?

And the Drummond Phlox. This red wildflower mixed with bluebonnets is absolutely stunning. Its seeds were shipped from Texas to Europe over 150 years ago where they are considered a prized exotic. Finally, a splash of yellow, Engelmann’s Daisy. Deer, cows and rabbits love it.

A riot of color is about to blanket the Lone Star State. Are you ready?

Get out and enjoy nature’s beauty as the days warm. There’s no place more beautiful than Texas in the spring!

Read the full article at http://texasagriculture.texasfarmbureau.org/article/Blooming+Texas/1964496/251234/article.html.

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